Inspection Lighting Standard for Class A automotive inspection area

T

Toefuzz - 2006

#1
I did some searching on both the Cove and google and thus far have come up empty... Does anyone know of a general standard for lighting requirements in a class A automotive inspection area? It doesn't necessarily need to be specific to the auto industry, really just any class A type inspection standard. I feel our shop is overlit and am considering changing things around but would like an objective starting point as to where things should be at. My hope is to greatly reduce our energy bill by reducing the number of lights we use and also changing to a more efficient lighting system.

Thanks!
 

Al Rosen

Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
NASA-STD-8739.3
December 1997
5. Lighting.
Light intensity shall be a minimum of 1077 lumens per square meter (lm/m2) (100 foot-candles) on the surface where soldered electrical connections are being performed, inspected, or tested. Supplemental lighting may be used to achieve the required lighting levels.
 
#3
I have a little book entitled “Appearance Inspection of Finished Surfaces” that has some good information and suggestions on proper lighting to achieve different results. The ISBN number for the book is 0-87389-100-7. It used to be available through ASQ but I searched their site and did not find it. I did find it through Amazon though by searching on the ISBN number.
 

bpritts

Involved - Posts
#4
I will add my endorsement to Badgerman's suggestion of the book by Cleaver, Michels, and Dennis - lots of helpful details. Let me also suggest that some
of the automotive customers have specifics in their standards. The GM paint
standard (GM 4348M) for paint include some specifics on how
painted surfaces are to be checked, including such details as lighting, background, etc. I wouldn't be surprised if other automotives had similar
specs.

Brad
 
T

Toefuzz - 2006

#5
Thanks for the quick responses everyone! I was fortunate enough to find a used copy of the book Badgerman mentioned on Amazon and it should be here early next week.

After doing a bit of research the consensus seems to be somewhere around 1000 lumens for any 'class a' automotive leve inspection.

A few references in case someone comes across this thread in the future:

***DEAD LINK REMOVED*** - Paint appearance spec from Roush. Includes lighting criteria.

http://personal.cityu.edu.hk/~bsapplec/lighting1.htm - Interesting site by a professor who teaches building environmental science. Includes quite a bit of information detailing how to measure light, what levels of light are required for various ares of a business, etc.


With that said, does anyone know of any references/tools for comparing various methods of lighting a shop (flourescent, incandescent, etc)? My plan is to walk through the plant and document what types of lighting I have, how many of each type, and how long each bulb is on everyday. Hopefully my electrician can tell me what I'm drawing and from that I can calculate cost. Once I have that information I can start looking at alternative methods of lighting our shop to see if there are any real cost savings.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Al Rosen

Staff member
Super Moderator
#6
Toefuzz said:
After doing a bit of research the consensus seems to be somewhere around 1000 lumens for any 'class a' automotive leve inspection.
Is that /sq meter or sq foot. It's meaningless w/o that info.

Toefuzz said:
With that said, does anyone know of any references/tools for comparing various methods of lighting a shop (flourescent, incandescent, etc)? My plan is to walk through the plant and document what types of lighting I have, how many of each type, and how long each bulb is on everyday. Hopefully my electrician can tell me what I'm drawing and from that I can calculate cost. Once I have that information I can start looking at alternative methods of lighting our shop to see if there are any real cost savings.
Incandescent lighting is about 5% efficient (95% is heat) and fluorescent lighting is 5 times more efficient than incandescent lighting. There are other considerations such as color asa well as the effect that fluorescent lighting has on some people due to the pulsing nature of the light (120/sec).
 
C

Charles Lloyd

#7
Toefuzz,

Some years ago I did extensive research for the Ford Motor Company to optimize the paint inspection lighting systems they use in their assembly plants. You can find a number of the papers we published on the papers site you can find by Googling "Charles Lloyd" and "Paint Inspection Lighting", and looking under the section titled "Lighting and Visual Inspection." Feel free to contact me if you would like to discuss.

Thank you,

Charles
 

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