KPIs and Quality Objectives: what are they and how many do you need?

Rob_Kellock

Involved In Discussions
Procedures and processes are different. Requirements are for the processes determined as per clause 4.4.
Not sure what point you are making. A procedure is a method of documenting part of or whole processes. If I wrote they had a process for managing BBQs which was supported by a procedure would that make a difference to my argument?
 

arpitadey15

On Holiday
In quality management, defining KPIs and objectives can be a subjective journey. While some auditors prefer a KPI for each process, others value measurable efforts and targets. It's crucial to strike a balance, ensuring meaningful metrics that align with organizational goals. The unpredictability of auditors resembles blind dates – diverse expectations. The key is demonstrating a commitment to continuous improvement, whether through specific KPIs or comprehensive measurement strategies.
 

AMIT BALLAL

Super Moderator
Not sure what point you are making. A procedure is a method of documenting part of or whole processes. If I wrote they had a process for managing BBQs which was supported by a procedure would that make a difference to my argument?
This has already been discussed in past. Refer to this thread.
 
Last edited:

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Leader
Super Moderator
Since words have meaning and we have already demonstrated that as a profession we struggle with fidelity to the assigned definitions of a standard (see all debates and questions regarding the difference between Corrective Actions, Preventive Actions and correction in any number of threads here) and have encountered many auditors who also like to make their own interpretations of the standards, can someone provide an exact quote(s) of the definition of the two terms “KPI” and “Quality Objective”? Normative definitions help us to talk about the same thing…
 

AMIT BALLAL

Super Moderator
can someone provide an exact quote(s) of the definition of the two terms “KPI” and “Quality Objective”?
The "KPI" word is not used in the ISO9001 / ISO9000 standard, hence no definition is available in these standards. As per ISO9000:2015, the definition of "Quality objective" is as follows.

1706757029589.png
 

Miner

Forum Moderator
Leader
Admin
The term KPI (Key Performance Indicator) seems to have originated outside of the quality realm. I suspect it may have appeared along with the concept of balanced scorecards. The linked article gives a good overview.

Update:
 

Attachments

  • KPIs and Quality Objectives:  what are they and how many do you need?
    KPIs.jpg
    133.5 KB · Views: 56
Last edited:

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Leader
Super Moderator
I have always used the term metric for a measure of process performance. Metrics - for me - are measures of characteristics of a process overtime.
Characteristics are dimensions, features, properties and functions of an individual part, event or thing that can be measured and has specification or tolerance limits. Within the specification limits the thing is acceptable and it is unacceptable when it exceeds these limits. So a metric is a measure of how one or more characteristics perform over time. Examples are:
Yield (or RTY or Defect Rate)
Cycle time
Inventory accuracy
On-Time Shipment (or delivery)
Turnaround time
Return Rate
Customer Complaints
COPQ…
Every metric should have a target (used by buyers, planners, budgets, etc. to manage the business). The target is usually one sided. (Greater than or less than) and managers should be managing to the targets. Supervisors, process engineers, technicians, equipment engineers, maintenance techs, SQEs and others are usually assigned with the responsibility of making daily adjustments, corrections and small improvements to keep the processes at target.

Objectives - for me - are those critical metrics that are either missing the target and having a substantial effect on the business (profit, sales, Customer Retention…aka “True North” in the Toyota Production System.) or that must be improved beyond what was an acceptable level to meet a new business requirement. This should be a short prioritized list. (Achievement of any improvement goal will require assigned resources as goals are not achieved through wishing, hoping or praying) We simple cannot improve everything everywhere all at once.
 
Top Bottom