Lean Six Sigma for Quality Management System

Mike S.

An Early 'Cover'
Trusted
#2
That kind of wide-open question is like asking someone to give you ideas on what to start with as far as repairing things around your house. We don;t know anything about your house.

First, learn what Lean Six Sigma is (and is not). Read some books on implementation. Decide with your Management if it is worth pursuing. Without Management support and a plan you won't be successful.
 

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Staff member
Super Moderator
#4
both replies ahve good advice. I would recommend the works of Bob Emiliani to get started. he is pure Toyota Production System and his blogs are free.

Most quality management systems are full of waste. start with a knowledge of the "7 wastes" and start working on how to reduce them.
1. overproduction
2. excess inventory (emails, corrective actions, NCRs, change orders, etc.)
3. transportation
4. excess motion
5. defects
6. overprocessing
7. waiting

be aware that each of these wastes creates the other 6...

also be cautious about "overprocessing". this is typically inspections, approvals and reviews. while these are wastes and they certainly do cause waiting, motion, excess inventory, etc. they are usually caused by defects (the root of all wastes). these defects may be real, perceived or potential. In the presence of defects it is NOT advisable to simply eliminate inspections, reviews or approvals as the escape of a defect can cause greater waste than the overprocessing itself. in teh case of overprocessing you must first determien if the inspection is necessarry. if nto eliminate or reduce it. if it is, focus on eliminating the defects.

Lean requires a deep understanding of it's principles and philosophies to be successful.

In the meantime I've attached two presentations I've made for ASQ national conferences. you might find some things in them helpful...
 

Attachments

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Staff member
Admin
#5
Can anyone sight me an insight on what to lean in the Quality System Management? For example? Give something to start with?
Many organizations overdocument their processes;i.e., too many and/or too detailed documents, which tends to create valueless bureaucracy. That’s an area I’ve seen many organizations applying lean, in.
 

eule del ayre

Involved In Discussions
#6
That kind of wide-open question is like asking someone to give you ideas on what to start with as far as repairing things around your house. We don;t know anything about your house.

First, learn what Lean Six Sigma is (and is not). Read some books on implementation. Decide with your Management if it is worth pursuing. Without Management support and a plan you won't be successful.
Sir, i am indeed sorry for that rude question of mine, let me clarify things up, i'm just asking for some examples wherein these said examples are just the same with some companies out there. For example at the warehouse, inventory system. I'm not asking for the whole thing sir, im just asking for the general topic like this one, 'cause im just new to this sort of thing, but for the lean, i know it already.
 

eule del ayre

Involved In Discussions
#7
Many organizations overdocument their processes;i.e., too many and/or too detailed documents, which tends to create valueless bureaucracy. That’s an area I’ve seen many organizations applying lean, in.
oh, good point right there sir, so applying six sigma will be paperless? like automated?
 

eule del ayre

Involved In Discussions
#8
Lean is mostly about the removal of waste, so when it comes to your QMS, are there processes that could be done more efficiently and effectively?
sir, i know about lean six sigma, i am looking for the topic sir, 'cause i'm a new employee and first job sir. so sorry for the rude question.
 

eule del ayre

Involved In Discussions
#9
both replies ahve good advice. I would recommend the works of Bob Emiliani to get started. he is pure Toyota Production System and his blogs are free.

Most quality managemetn systems are full of waste. start with a knowledge of the "7 wastes" and start workgin on how to reduce them.
1. overproduction
2. excess inventory (emails, corrective actions, NCRs, change orders, etc.)
3. transportation
4. excess motion
5. defects
6. overprocessing
7. waiting

be aware that each of these wastes creates the other 6...

also be cautious about "overprocessing". this is typically inspections, approvals and reviews. while these are wastes and they certainly do cause waiting, motion, excess inventory, etc. they are usually caused by defects (the root of all wastes). these defects may be real, perceived or potential. In the presence of defects it is NOT advisable to simply eliminate inspections, reviews or approvals as the escape of a defect can cause greater waste than the overprocessing itself. in teh case of overprocessing you must first determien if the inspection is necessarry. if nto eliminate or reduce it. if it is, focus on eliminating the defects.

Lean requires a deep understanding of it's principles and philosophies to be successful.

In the meantime I've attached two presentations I've made for ASQ national conferences. you might find some things in them helpful...
sir, thanks a lot for that insights, ill read it well and cascade it after, so sorry for the question, im just new to this kind of world, first job sir, but i already know about lean six sigma, i just want some topic to be share to me, cause i know for industrial company/plant, they got the same process map, and for me being new to this, i just want some topic, to propose for this said lean six sigma
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#10
Eule del ayre, if you are familiar with lean six sigma (based on your provided statement to this fact), perhaps what you should is become familiar with the organization where you work.

That said, just because you may identify an area of waste, I would not suggest that you immediately go all "six sigma" on it. As this is your first job, forming networks within your company is a critical component to your professional development as is learning to work with others who may have more hands-on experience than you. I highly encourage you to involve the people who DO the jobs to be a part of your organization's lean six sigma journey. They may know about the current state (and some of the hidden components of it) than you and it is a wise individual who uses such information.

That said, an area that can help enable the idea of value-added improvements is your organization's internal audit program. Many audit programs audit just to the standard (that is to say "Do we meet the requirement - yes or no?"). I suggest providing your internal auditors with the the knowledge and the authorization to make recommendations that have a foundation in lean, waste removal, and value-adding .
 

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