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Learning by gaming / (gamification)

DrTBurns

Starting to get Involved
#11
I should also add that is you travel on public transport you will see the majority of folk with their heads down looking at mobiles. Wouldn't it be far better that your employees were playing quality learning games than useless ones? Of course expectations for games today are very high. There is no point in trying to engage employees in learning about quality, if the games are not at the same level of sophistication as entertainment games. 2D 'pop out' games from 'pop out' e-learning development products just won't cut it today. Training games need game engines driving them.

I feel too, that the future for training in quality is mobiles. Even as a developer, I still get a thrill out of seeing such cool quality training in the palm of my hand. I've seen our stuff on PC vs mobile for many years and the mobile phone app has something that grabs me. Just me. Others may be different.
 

DrTBurns

Starting to get Involved
#12
Oh, another good one (from the old days of moving pennies around as tokens) is MIT's "The Beer Game".
Interesting ... but pennies or beer bottles need much more to look engaging on a screen though Steve. It has taken us many years to find training delivery vehicles that look great on screen.
 

DrTBurns

Starting to get Involved
#13
After almost 3 decades of building quality training games, there are so many topics I get so excited about because I have spent so many years thinking about them. Even the simple issue of showing people instead of objects (pennies, beer bottles or cubes etc). What should the people look like? People can be built to look very realistic and move realistically in 3D but they look boring. What's the alternative?

In the opening description of histograms, we thought people would be useful. This is sometimes done in the classroom, in explaining histograms, where students are asked to sort themselves by height. A hour or so stuffing around in the classroom is 3D animated into a group of characters milling around on screen, that then walk into columns according to height. The message is conveyed beautifully and more powerfully in seconds, rather than wasting time in the classroom.

Not a game but more a sim. I still find it fascinating to watch, especially the way all the characters sort themselves out, bumping into one another. It is different every time you run it.
 
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