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Life after the Personal Computer

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Miner

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Admin
#3
Our company is almost entirely using laptops. Desk stations are only used for major processing like FEA. The screens on a smart phone are too small for serious computer work, but I can see tablets taking over most personal computing. I can't see it for the type of work that I do because I use large dual monitors and the tablet touch keypad is awkward for heavy typing.
 

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Staff member
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#4
I don't doubt computers as we know them in the enterprise will be the last to go. The key will be computers becoming so small that a tiny docking station linking to a monitor and keyboard will be the norm for a while.

My problem with smart phones is the screen size (just as you cite), and of course data entry/control. The iPad I bought isn't too bad, but even there it's a relatively small screen (about 10" in this case of my iPad). I did get a bluetooth keyboard for it but rarely use it because of what I use the tablet for.

It appears the ~7" tablets are the "coming thing", but considering "Pappa Bear, Momma Bear and Baby Bear" aspect of screen size, I'll take the Poppa Bear tablet screen.
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
#5
From the time I got my first battery powered LED handheld calculator in 1970 to the present day, I have witnessed first hand the "truth" of Moore's Law about the speed and capacity of the integrated circuits in computers.

Nowhere is it more evident than the evolution from my first electronic calculator (which weighed about a pound and could add, subtract, multiply, divide, but not do square roots) and cost $300 to today's smartphone which weighs a few ounces, takes photos, has built-in GPS, and has more computing power than my 100 pound desktop in 1990 and costs 1/2 of $300 [with a contract.]

Heck! My first Motorola cell phone weighed more than a house brick and had so little battery life that I carried 2 spare batteries everywhere I went. (I still have a "bag phone" and one of those "house bricks" sitting on a shelf in my garage. :))
 

Michael_M

Trusted Information Resource
#6
I think attitude will have allot to do with personal computers as well, as the new pads and phones work into the younger generation and they start moving into the work place environment, it will change;

I use a desktop, laptop, and an Ipad. I find that when I am sitting in front of the desktop, I focus on work, the laptop makes me want to move around and I lose focus, and the Ipad I just want to play games on.

I grew up in the era of desktops so most of my computer use has been on a desktop. I try using my phone for e-mails but usually I just read the e-mails and reply when I get to my desktop (I find it difficult to get my fat fingers able to type properly and voice only works about 1/2 the time).
 

insect warfare

QA=Question Authority
Trusted Information Resource
#7
From the time I got my first battery powered LED handheld calculator in 1970 to the present day, I have witnessed first hand the "truth" of Moore's Law about the speed and capacity of the integrated circuits in computers.

Nowhere is it more evident than the evolution from my first electronic calculator (which weighed about a pound and could add, subtract, multiply, divide, but not do square roots) and cost $300 to today's smartphone which weighs a few ounces, takes photos, has built-in GPS, and has more computing power than my 100 pound desktop in 1990 and costs 1/2 of $300 [with a contract.]

Heck! My first Motorola cell phone weighed more than a house brick and had so little battery life that I carried 2 spare batteries everywhere I went. (I still have a "bag phone" and one of those "house bricks" sitting on a shelf in my garage. :))
Moore's Law reminds me of the "simulation argument" that first started to gain traction with philosophers and futurists around the time that the movie "The Matrix" came out.

The fundamental question behind the argument is: Are we currently living in a computer simulation? These people have proposed that the likelihood that this is true is somewhere between 10-20%, depending on whose article you read.

The meat of the argument is that at least one of the following propositions is true: (1) the human species is very likely to go extinct before reaching a “posthuman” stage; (2) any posthuman civilization is extremely unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history (or variations thereof); (3) we are almost certainly living in a computer simulation. It follows that the belief that there is a significant chance that we will one day become posthumans who run ancestor-simulations is false, unless we are currently living in a simulation. A number of other consequences of this result are also discussed.

I have provided a link to a PDF file for starters. :popcorn: Whether or not you believe the hype, it is still a pretty interesting topic, especially for paradoxical enthusiasts - anyways, enjoy!!!

Brian :rolleyes:
 

Helmut Jilling

Auditor / Consultant
#8
Moore's Law reminds me of the "simulation argument" that first started to gain traction with philosophers and futurists around the time that the movie "The Matrix" came out.

The fundamental question behind the argument is: Are we currently living in a computer simulation? These people have proposed that the likelihood that this is true is somewhere between 10-20%, depending on whose article you read.

The meat of the argument is that at least one of the following propositions is true: (1) the human species is very likely to go extinct before reaching a “posthuman” stage; (2) any posthuman civilization is extremely unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history (or variations thereof); (3) we are almost certainly living in a computer simulation. It follows that the belief that there is a significant chance that we will one day become posthumans who run ancestor-simulations is false, unless we are currently living in a simulation. A number of other consequences of this result are also discussed.

I have provided a link to a PDF file for starters. :popcorn: Whether or not you believe the hype, it is still a pretty interesting topic, especially for paradoxical enthusiasts - anyways, enjoy!!!

Brian :rolleyes:

I still like the traditional view...that God put us on the earth for a purpose, that this is a reality, and there is an afterlife called heaven and hell...I hope we don't completely get rid of that in our computer age... just sayin' :cool:
 

Helmut Jilling

Auditor / Consultant
#9
I don't doubt computers as we know them in the enterprise will be the last to go. The key will be computers becoming so small that a tiny docking station linking to a monitor and keyboard will be the norm for a while.

My problem with smart phones is the screen size (just as you cite), and of course data entry/control. The iPad I bought isn't too bad, but even there it's a relatively small screen (about 10" in this case of my iPad). I did get a bluetooth keyboard for it but rarely use it because of what I use the tablet for.

It appears the ~7" tablets are the "coming thing", but considering "Pappa Bear, Momma Bear and Baby Bear" aspect of screen size, I'll take the Poppa Bear tablet screen.
I agree. The small screen seems so limiting. What happened to those cool glasses they advertised back in 1999? The ones where a whole screen was "projected" out in front of your eyes. We were all supposed to be using them by now! Marc, I like your idea of a mobile and a docking station. That could be a good compromise.

I have been conducting a poll on airplanes. As a frequent flyer I get upgrades a lot. When someone next to me is using an iPad, I sometimes ask if they still carry a laptop.

So far, only 3 people indicated they did not bring their laptop. One was a retired guy on a short 3 day trip. He was watching a movie. One was a guy on a day trip who usually brings a laptop, but left it behind since it was a one day trip.

But the last guy was interesting. He was an exec, said he always leaves his laptop on, sitting o his desk. He links to it using a remote program like PC Anywhere, and says he loves it. He was a major power-user, doing heavy spreadsheet analysis, emails, memos and docs, multi-tasking... Have really never seen someone using an iPad that extensively, but he showed that it could be done. I was a little impressed, but, so far, he was the only one.

Also, I'm not sure that I would want to link remotely like that. I always thought that really slowed things down. Mainly, I avoid doing sensitive work when there are that many eyes around me. Since I work with client's audit reports and confidential info, I make sure other people can't read it.

So, I use a small laptop with high resolution. That still gives me a lot of information on screen, but makes the screen font pretty small and confidential. I just have to use reading glasses to read it.

It will be interesting to see this continue to unfold. Tablets clearly are the future. Even Bill Gates said that for years. Just ironic that Microsoft was not positioned to be a force in that market, given that he had that vision for years.
 

Colin

Quite Involved in Discussions
#10
Interesting stuff Helmut. Having toyed with the idea of getting an iPad I have just recently bought the Nexus 7 to try out. I now have a desktop PC for my normal use at home, a standard sized laptop for any serious work involving typing e.g. audit reports, a netbook which I use when presenting courses through a projector and for minor typing activities and now the Nexus which I keep in my bag or by the TV in case I want quick access to the Internet.

I surprised how quickly I have got used to the 7" screen, it hardly seems to bother me because of the ability to zoom using 'gestures'. I suspect that I could do without the full size laptop but for the fact that my hands are 'big and clunky' and my typing skills are OK, but limited - my accuracy is not what it was, largely due to a medical condition.

I don't yet foresee the day I would want to be without the desktop (with dual screens) though.
 
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