Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo including content not in the forum - Search results with No ads.

Looking for recommendations for an automated vision measuring system

psp1234

Involved In Discussions
#1
Hi,
I hope I can use the forum's members to get recommendations an automatic vision measuring system.:evidence: stage size to fit 5" parts.
(I hope it is not considered "commercial").
The variety is large and after seeing smartscope (SNAP), Keyence (IM), MicroVu (EXCEL) ..I ma already confused.
Can anyone help with a personal experience?
If it is not allowed here to recommend brands, I will be also happy to receive info in my email: orensi at gmail dot com.

Thank you in advance:thanx:
Sue
 

somashekar

Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
Hi,
I hope I can use the forum's members to get recommendations an automatic vision measuring system.:evidence: stage size to fit 5" parts.
(I hope it is not considered "commercial").
The variety is large and after seeing smartscope (SNAP), Keyence (IM), MicroVu (EXCEL) ..I ma already confused.
Can anyone help with a personal experience?
If it is not allowed here to recommend brands, I will be also happy to receive info in my email: orensi at gmail dot com.

Thank you in advance:thanx:
Sue
Please look at CUSTOMISED technologies for your option.

Note: I am in no way affiliated with this company
 
#4
Hi,
I hope I can use the forum's members to get recommendations an automatic vision measuring system.
I hope that is what we are here for.


Hi,
The variety is large and after seeing smartscope (SNAP), Keyence (IM), MicroVu (EXCEL) ..I ma already confused.
Can anyone help with a personal experience?

I currently use a manual MicroVu and have seen the automatic MicroVu and they are nice and fairly easy to use. They have some advanced features that when needed may take a bit of learning (from watching others use it).
 
#5
A quick copy/paste from a similar thread I posted this anno on:

My most recent CMM experience left me very unhappy.

The sales guy for Hexagon Metrology demoed a Romer Arm, and everything looked great.

I went for training for a weekend in Los Angeles - a lot to swallow but I got what I needed, or so I thought.

I got home and my machine had been delivered with a differing version of the software. Problem one.

I called the sales guy, who came down and walked me through what I needed to know at that time. He also informed me that he was going to work for the competition next week and I'd never see him again, but the guys at Hexagon would take care of me.

When I identified new challenges, Hexagon sent out the trainer. That was good for that instance, but they were not enthusiastic about sending me somebody every time I had questions. So I asked for the manual so I could consult it whenever I ventured into new territory.

There was no manual. They ceased maintaining documentation for the user several years ago. They gave me a 1-800 number that rang to a phone on somebody's desk several states away, and they'd get back to me in 48 hours.

And they gave me a link to a forum, where a bunch of users with differing machines and software corresponded. Sometimes it was helpful, but usually not. It was like learning to fly an airliner by hanging out in the airport and talking to people passing by.

Now you have an environment where there are multiple skilled users, so you'd probably not suffer as I did. I was the only person in the company with a little bit of training and some previous experience on a couple of RAM Optical systems, which were well documented and user friendly, albeit without all the capability of the Romer Arm.

But I felt that I got left high and dry by the supplier once the sale was made, and I would never buy another system without first determining if there was current documentation first. I would not rely on promises of support.
 

WCHorn

Rubber, Too Glamorous?
Trusted
#6
The initial choice for a non-contact measuring machine can be daunting. There is no substitute for first-hand evaluation. Ask the salesperson to identify a location where you can take a selection of parts you want to measure try it yourself. Watch to see if the operator is manipulating the software and machine or vice versa. Check to see if the machine is repeatable and accurate. Make sure the lighting is versatile as it can be critical to getting accurate measurements. Compare advertised accuracy and speed to actual.

Make a list of important attributes for a system and grade each one like Consumer Reports grades products. Such an analysis will give you a solid foundation for your eventual choice.

We have had two consecutive MicroVu systems. We had a Vector (predecessor to the Vertex) for about 10 years and replaced it with a Vertex about four years ago. Our measurements are mostly on uncomplicated shapes, but the Vector is easy to use and has served us well for complicated shapes.

You mentioned that you are measuring parts up to 5" and cited the MicroVu Excel as one of your considerations. The Excel is a large machine with a capacity far greater than 5". Why not consider the Vertex?
 

psp1234

Involved In Discussions
#7
Hi,
Thank you all for your comments! :thanks: so great to have a cove to go to!
I am confused because with the sales people present everything looks great. I do repeatability analysis (measure same part 50 times and GRR etc.).
They all look very similar in performance.
I am not sure about service and most importantly - long term accuracy and precision. New models make the market more unsure, b/c no experience about long time performance.
If you can mention model numbers, it will be great!

(I will look at the vertex, thanks)
Regards,
Sue
 
Top Bottom