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Management Tool - Does each of them have their STRENGTH and WEAKNESSES?

B

berseak

#1
Someone said All management tool is OK. But when implementation to company. The company can't capture it.

I disagree with this.

I think each management tool have STRENGTH and WEAKNESS when you choose tool for implement to company. you will know it for this.

Ex. ISO9001 for Quality, TPM for Machine etc.

Thank you
 
#3
I think each management tool have STRENGTH and WEAKNESS when you choose tool for implement to company.
I may have misinterpreted the question here, so feel free to correct me if I am moving in the wrong direction, but yes: Any tool, from a hammer to a Space Shuttle, or indeed a management tool or system, has its inherent strengths and weaknesses. They also need to be choosen on the grounds of intended use.

/Claes
 

harry

Super Moderator
#4
I may have misinterpreted the question here, so feel free to correct me if I am moving in the wrong direction, but yes: Any tool, from a hammer to a Space Shuttle, or indeed a management tool or system, has its inherent strengths and weaknesses. They also need to be choosen on the grounds of intended use.

/Claes
Agree. Instead of the term strength and weaknesses, a better term to use in my opinion is 'relevance'. 5Why, 8D and fault tree analysis are all very good tools in their own right. The 'user' must have a good understanding of the tool and the situation before deciding which of the 3 is most relevant under that particular situation. If the outcome is proven in-effective, it is not because there are weaknesses in the tool but employing a wrong one.
 

Jim Wynne

Staff member
Admin
#5
Agree. Instead of the term strength and weaknesses, a better term to use in my opinion is 'relevance'. 5Why, 8D and fault tree analysis are all very good tools in their own right. The 'user' must have a good understanding of the tool and the situation before deciding which of the 3 is most relevant under that particular situation. If the outcome is proven in-effective, it is not because there are weaknesses in the tool but employing a wrong one.
In addition to relevance, there's also the question of execution. How many SPC implementations have failed due to lack of understanding of the "tools" and how to best apply them. The same is true of most of the other tool and strategies. They often die on the vine because of lack of management support and the absence of people who understand how to use them.

There seems to be an abiding belief that presence of the tools themselves should be enough, and it really doesn't matter whether anyone knows how to use them or not. We give people hammers, nails and wood and act surprised when they don't magically become master carpenters or worse yet, we blame the failure on the tools themselves.
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#6
To summarize the good responses so far I will simply say the weakness is in the tools' application and execution.

In simple terms, its value is in it is how it's used.
 
P

pliniustheelder

#8
The problem with any tool or system is that it can stop people from doing their own thinking; they rely on the tool to solve the problem. A hammer can after all only put nails into things soft enough to take nails or pull them out. It may in fact be the wrong tool for the job. It is still the carpenter that builds a useful product. They do this by selecting the correct tools for each situation.
 
#9
The problem with any tool or system is that it can stop people from doing their own thinking; they rely on the tool to solve the problem. A hammer can after all only put nails into things soft enough to take nails or pull them out. It may in fact be the wrong tool for the job. It is still the carpenter that builds a useful product. They do this by selecting the correct tools for each situation.
I would suspect that this may be a concern only if the user had zero exposure, training or experience using the tool. In your own example with the hammer, you finish by saying the carpenter selects the correct tool for the job; this requires knowledge, experience and common sense.

I think the risk of someone using a tool without thinking and assuming it will solve their problems for them is low. It's a tool, which is something that HELPS you accomplish a task.
 

insect warfare

QA=Question Authority
Trusted
#10
I would suspect that this may be a concern only if the user had zero exposure, training or experience using the tool. In your own example with the hammer, you finish by saying the carpenter selects the correct tool for the job; this requires knowledge, experience and common sense.

I think the risk of someone using a tool without thinking and assuming it will solve their problems for them is low. It's a tool, which is something that HELPS you accomplish a task.
In keeping with this analogy, I wouldn't hesitate to mention the occasional carpenter who will use the handle end of a large screwdriver to hammer in some nails and still get the job done, because they accidentally forgot to equip themselves with a hammer that day, or misplaced it in the short term. I too believe that selecting the right management tool for the job is paramount, but resourcefulness and versatility in how you are able to apply those tools can go a long way too - if you're clever enough...

Brian
 
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