Measurement of Water in a Seal Groove

U

Uchiha

Hi all:

In our production process, we are machining a part in different operations. One of which is machining a seal groove.
After the machining opeartions, the part is washed using water and dried automatically.

We want to check if there is (some) water remaining in the seal groove after the drying operation (the ideal case is no water remaining).
Actually, we know that the quantity remaining is minimal (example: if you take the part and shake it manually, the water would not come off the seal groove).

Since the seal groove is so small, we are not sure about the way to use to check how much water is still remaining there.
We have an idea to use an ear bud (cotton swab) to check, but in such case it is difficult to define a judgment criterion...

If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.

Thanks,
Uchiha
 

normzone

Trusted Information Resource
Re: Measurment of Water in a Seal Groove

Can you eliminate the need for measuring by drying it out completely, say with compressed air?

I know, this is probably exactly what you're doing already...

:bonk:

Is there anything you can use that changes color when it touches water?
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Re: Measurment of Water in a Seal Groove

Hi all:

In our production process, we are machining a part in different operations. One of which is machining a seal groove.
After the machining opeartions, the part is washed using water and dried automatically.

We want to check if there is (some) water remaining in the seal groove after the drying operation (the ideal case is no water remaining).
Actually, we know that the quantity remaining is minimal (example: if you take the part and shake it manually, the water would not come off the seal groove).

Since the seal groove is so small, we are not sure about the way to use to check how much water is still remaining there.
We have an idea to use an ear bud (cotton swab) to check, but in such case it is difficult to define a judgment criterion...

If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.

Thanks,
Uchiha

Uchiha,

It sounds like drying the seal is a special process in need of design and validation (see 7.5.2).

You'd validate the standardized drying process by drying a "dried" seal in an oven set slightly above boiling point over 24 hours.

I'm not sure what impact this validation method would have on the characteristics of the seal.

Your product/process designers have more work to do. They may say the seal is acceptable if "damp".

John
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Don't blow it wit pressurized air and don't overcomplicate the stinking thing...Always vacuum moisture out unless baking like a brick is required like John says

It's easy to adapt a large vacuum hose down to a smaller one with something as simple as duct tape....It definitely doesn't required a PhD in Engineering to figure it out and just suck the stuff out
 
U

Uchiha

Thanks all for your replies.

However, I am not trying to wash the seal, and I am not trying to improve the washing and drying process of the seal groove.

I need to judge how efficient is the washing and then drying operation of the seal groove by the means of the (small) quantity if water that remains in the seal groove after it is washed and dried.
That is why I would like to know if there is any way how to check the quantity of water in a very small space (seal groove in this case).

Let me know if you still need more details.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Sounds like a wasted process, you'd be better served at less potential cost to just get rid of the water to begin with

Wasted time = wasted resources = wasted money
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Thanks all for your replies.

However, I am not trying to wash the seal, and I am not trying to improve the washing and drying process of the seal groove.

I need to judge how efficient is the washing and then drying operation of the seal groove by the means of the (small) quantity if water that remains in the seal groove after it is washed and dried.
That is why I would like to know if there is any way how to check the quantity of water in a very small space (seal groove in this case).

Let me know if you still need more details.

Uchiha,

I repeat, if you cannot verify the dryness of the seal then drying is a special process per 7.5.2.

Does the seal need to be completely dry? Is some residual moisture acceptable?

What is making the seal dirty in the first place? Can this be prevented?

Can the seals be completely dried in an enclosed space with a desiccant such as silica gel?

https://www.tedpella.com/technote_html/desiccant.pdf

John
 
U

Uchiha

John,

I see your point and I agree.

However, John, please understand I am not asking about the seal.
My concern is simple: how to measure the quantity of water in a very small space (in this case a seal groove, in the part! And not the seal itself).

My question is purely technical and I am not seeking improvement ideas of the dryness or cleanliness of the seal (that is a complete different subject).

I hope you understand my question, and if you have any ideas I would be glad to read them.

Uchiha
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Uchiha,

Ah. I see now that the groove is for the seal not in the seal.

Sorry about that.

Let's see if another Cover can come up with a way of measuring the dryness of the part.

John
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted Information Resource
The best way I can think of to measure "IF" there is water present is a color change (as mentioned in a previous post).
Go to ebay and buy a color changing umbrella or bikini, cut it into strips and wipe the groove....does the color change?

(I keep looking for a simple liquid to put on a swab but am coming up short. I forget my freshman year chemistry!

For "HOW MUCH", the only real way to do this practically would be by weight. How much does the part weigh if fully dry?
Is it possible to discern a weight loss between "damp" and "dry" ?

You can consider checking the weight gain of the swab...but you would be measuring how much water you got with the swab...not how much was in the groove.
 
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