Micron to Inch Conversion

KosmoQA

Inactive Registered Visitor
#1
I have always had a hard time understanding the CMM Calibration Technicians who have serviced our CMM's over the years because they speak in terms of microns and I speak in terms of inches. I have done some research online and I think that I have figured out how to convert from microns to inches, but I would like a verification from anyone who knows for sure. Below is the conversion equation that I have come up with after doing my research.

1 micron = 0.0254 inches

Is this correct?:confused:
 
E

EtobiLad - 2009

#2
KosmoQA

the correct conversion is:
1 micron = 0.000 039 37 inch [international, U.S.]

I did not come up with this K? Here's a valuable site for all you conversion needs and it help me to find this out.. Here
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#3
I have always had a hard time understanding the CMM Calibration Technicians who have serviced our CMM's over the years because they speak in terms of microns and I speak in terms of inches. I have done some research online and I think that I have figured out how to convert from microns to inches, but I would like a verification from anyone who knows for sure. Below is the conversion equation that I have come up with after doing my research.

1 micron = 0.0254 inches

Is this correct?:confused:
No:

1 inch = 25,400 microns so,

1/25400 = .00003937 inches
 

Tim Folkerts

Super Moderator
#4
You can also use google!


Just type "convert 1 micron to inches" into the google and you get "[SIZE=+1]1 micron = 3.93700787 × 10-5 inches"

[/SIZE] And it does many other units as well. Like "convert 1.23 btu to joules" gives "1.23 btu = 1 297.7187 joules".
 

KosmoQA

Inactive Registered Visitor
#5
You know, I did do a search on Google and I saw the conversion amount displayed, but at the time I didn't realize that it was giving me the answer in scientific notation! :bonk:
 

Tim Folkerts

Super Moderator
#6
It's amazing how easy to overlook things that you are not watching for! I do that too sometimes When the context isn't right, your mind just skips right over certain things.


A classic example is this little video. http://viscog.beckman.uiuc.edu/grafs/demos/15.html

Watch carefully and count how many times the white team passes the basketball. How many did you get? Did you see all 14?


Now just watch it in general... :lol:
 

Wes Bucey

Consultant/Advisor
Moderator
#7
Speaking of mathematical notation that can leave the casual observer going, "Huh?" I recall the very first time I encountered the symbol for a factorial (!) long before my high school math caught up. I remember clearly thinking back in the 50's, "Wow! This must be something special if they put an exclamation point after the number!"

To make matters worse, the teachers I had at the time had no clue, either.

It took an uncle who was an aeronautical engineer to clue me in when I casually mentioned I had seen this in Scientific American.
 

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