Need feedback: FMEA Web Application

#1
Hi all,

I'm thinking about an idea for a FMEA (Failure Mode Effect Analysis) web application and I wanted your advice. Currently, I found out that current FMEA software tools on the market are complex to use and/or expensive, and people tend to use excel.

Here is my idea: Building a ease to use web application for performing and storing FMEA studies, which is user friendly and cheap.

What do you think of it? Are you currently using FMEA software or not for specific reasons? Would you like to see a ease to use FMEA web application?

Hopefully you can help me out!

Simon
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#2
Welcome Simon!

I am sorry for the delay in this response.

It is hard to know what to advise, as I am comfortable with Excel and its flexibility. Nor have I used the complex programs you describe.

I can offer, however that I have seen people misuse the FMEA by piling in multiple potential failure modes and/or effects; this makes scoring imprecise and confuses the effort to re-evaluate after improvements.

It would also be nice if your app provided the means to make reiterative improvements that allow a user to lower the RPN, and provide simple guidance into how to assign Severity, and what type of improvement would allow them to reduce that number.
 

John Broomfield

Fully retired...
Trusted
#3
Simon,

This sounds like a good idea so I looked in the Apple Store and found this:

Engineering FMEA by DRH YAZILIM VE MUHENDISLIK HIZMETLERI LTD STI

Engineering FMEA on the App Store

...judging by the lack of reviews it is not selling very well.

But it may provide a useful starting point for your project.

Best wishes,

John
 

Ron Rompen

Trusted Information Resource
Trusted
#4
I have used some of the 'fancy' dedicated FMEA software, and have been disappointed/dissatisfied every time. Either its too complex to use, or it doesn't allow ANY flexibility, or it just doesnt give me what I want.

In my opinion, the best all-around tool for doing FMEA analysis is Excel - everyone has it, it's easily customizable (especially if you are good at writing macros), very flexible, and will integrate with your other (Microsoft) software packages seamlessly.

With that being said, I would welcome a new FMEA package - just not quite sure how to articulate what it is that I want to see in it.
 
#5
I have used some of the 'fancy' dedicated FMEA software, and have been disappointed/dissatisfied every time. Either its too complex to use, or it doesn't allow ANY flexibility, or it just doesnt give me what I want.

In my opinion, the best all-around tool for doing FMEA analysis is Excel - everyone has it, it's easily customizable (especially if you are good at writing macros), very flexible, and will integrate with your other (Microsoft) software packages seamlessly.

With that being said, I would welcome a new FMEA package - just not quite sure how to articulate what it is that I want to see in it.
Ron - In my experience, decades as a Systems Engineer and a certified 6Sigma Master Black Belt, there is no practical way to efficiently manage the Risk Analysis effectively in Excel. You'll make mistakes, and not do well keeping DFMEA's synchronized with PFMEA's (and PFMEA's to Control Plans). "Fancy" software...well, this is an "analysis" isn't it? We use "fancy" software for DOE's, FEA's, CFD models, CAD models...but, for some reason we think that the FMEA doesn't require the same rigor. It's about how we think about the analysis...and then letting the software help us execute that thinking. Excel doesn't generally guide us towards anything more than "ok folks, what can go wrong?" thinking.
 
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Ron Rompen

Trusted Information Resource
Trusted
#6
Ron - In my experience, decades as a Systems Engineer and a certified 6Sigma Master Black Belt, there is no practical way to efficiently manage the Risk Analysis effectively in Excel. You'll make mistakes, and not do well keeping DFMEA's synchronized with PFMEA's (and PFMEA's to Control Plans). "Fancy" software...well, this is an "analysis" isn't it? We use "fancy" software for DOE's, FEA's, CFD models, CAD models...but, for some reason we think that the FMEA doesn't require the same rigor. It's about how we think about the analysis...and then letting the software help us execute that thinking. Excel doesn't generally guide us towards anything more than "ok folks, what can go wrong?" thinking.
Very valid points, and I can't disagree. I think my biggest caveat is that (so far) I haven't found a software package that will DO a decent job of syncing my documents. That is why I have always fallen back on Excel - yes it has its own flaws, and its NOT as bulletproof as it could be (and requires a LOT of double-checking and verifying), but it does have the advantage of being (relatively) inexpensive, easy to use, and universal.
 
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