Neglect or legitimate deferral? Is excessive workload or lack of resources in a department or a team a valid root cause for a non-conformance?

cferrer

Involved In Discussions
#11
Well, the thing is that a support process was not being followed for a while and went undetected. It was uncovered only later during an audit, long after it had caused abandonment of certain activities. It turns out a person had been transfered and no successor was appointed, leaving the process unattended.
However, this department was extremely overloaded and the issue just probably "not important enough" for them, but it is pretty important for the QMS.
 
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Melissa

Starting to get Involved
#14
Just a thought, I was taught you just keep asking why....why....why... (usually a minimum of 5 times and you should get there) I know, sounds crazy but works for me every time!
 

optomist1

A Sea of Statistics
Super Moderator
#15
Just a thought, I was taught you just keep asking why....why....why... (usually a minimum of 5 times and you should get there) I know, sounds crazy but works for me every time!
Yep although typically dull and boring, the 5 Whys is/are effective, and to effectively execute this, a clear statement of the problem is essential, below a suggested structure....hope this helps Optomist1
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#16
you may want to look at process design, what is it about the process that lets people cut corners or allows them to pass on a defect. For example in mechanical assembly you can poka-yoke it so it can't be assembled incorrectly? In package sealing if you use a near vertical table the seal cant be applied to the wrong end (the product would fall out if presented incorrectly). Yes you can't prevent all instances of human error, but are there options to make it harder for people to make the errors in the first place.
 
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