New Job Presentation on my findings and plans for future

8balluk

Starting to get Involved
#1
hi all,

Ive got to 2nd stage interview for a lean engineer and was looking for some sound advice.

The next step involves a tour of the facility asking many questions and coming back to the office where i am left alone for an hour to write a presentation on my findings and plans for future.

Was wondering what the best of attacking the presentation is. i was thinking of writing it along the short, medium and long terms goals of the company from a lean perspective. Do you think this will work. Any other advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 
#2
hi all,

Ive got to 2nd stage interview for a lean engineer and was looking for some sound advice.

The next step involves a tour of the facility asking many questions and coming back to the office where i am left alone for an hour to write a presentation on my findings and plans for future.

Was wondering what the best of attacking the presentation is. i was thinking of writing it along the short, medium and long terms goals of the company from a lean perspective. Do you think this will work. Any other advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
As some Cove readers may remember, I was one of the charter members of the ASQ "Advanced Manufacturing Interest" group which evolved into the current Lean Division.

Our basic premise in helping an organization "transform" into a Lean operation was to simply perform a Gap Analysis showing current status and future status.

A simple way of presenting this in outline form is in two columns on one sheet of paper. Left column presents current status, right presents desired future status.

The different items can be listed either

  1. in a chronological order of the organization operations from the first idea of a product design or service offered through the steps to final realization or
  2. on a department by department basis (trying to arrange priorities of what department needs most attention in transformation to Lean.)
I, personally, always emphasized implementation of Deming's System of Profound Knowledge (SoPK) as a way of making the transformation "holistic" rather than as a group of silos working at cross purposes.

Since you only have an hour, in your place, I would try to make a bare bones outline of my findings as quickly as possible and then spend the remaining time describing the detail of "how" I would approach the transformation of just one of those items.

The key difference between a "real" analysis as a consultant like me would approach the task and the "sample" analysis presented by a job candidate is that

  1. as a consultant, I would be getting paid for the analysis and presentation and would use more time and detail on ALL the points
  2. as a candidate, I would be leery of giving away too much milk without selling the cow.
I hope that helps you with the basics of approaching the task as a candidate.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#3
That being said by Wes (and it makes a lot of sense),

As a candidate I might point out areas of POTENTIAL improvement, then make the presentation about how you would approach the possible improvements (sampling plans, types of analysis you are skilled in, ways you have achieved improvements in other companies, etc.)

This is an opportunity to show off why they should hire you...but you don't have to actually DO THE JOB in order to get the job.
 

8balluk

Starting to get Involved
#4
Thanks

I like the simplicity of having current and future headings. Makes it easier for the viewer to see and take in.

Think I will categorise these individual projects into short medium and long term.

Thanks
 

8balluk

Starting to get Involved
#5
Good advice there about identifying their issue and then cross referencing it with my skills.
Will definitely be doing this as well.

Thanks
 
P

peacewong

#6
I think you'd better to show them the long- and short-term roadmap, including potential benefits that they will get. Money!
 
#7
It occurs to me to mention there is a "controversial" technique suggested by a few job hunt counselors for candidates to use in the job interview.

I say "controversial" because it is NOT suggested by most job hunt counselors and has a chance of scaring the interviewer that HE is being tested.

The technique involves writing out a one page outline of how the candidate will provide value to the hiring company in three plateaus (30 days/60 days/90 days.) In short, how the candidate will "hit the ground running."

The key to this is the research the candidate has done in creating his own Skills Assessment Matrix
and matching it against a similar grid created from his research about the target company.

Understand, this is ALL ABOUT what the candidate will do, NOT about what the candidate expects the company to do in a similar period.

Anecdotal evidence from my conversations with job hunt counselors and readings I've been scanning over the past few months indicate this is considered a "Hail Mary" technique. The candidate looks like:

  • a star to be snatched up if he hits the right chord;
  • an arrogant, desperate fool if he is sloppy in his research or hasn't been able to convince an interviewer from his demeanor during the interview that he can, indeed, perform the things contained in the 30/60/90 plan.
 


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