Non-Conformance Report for Concession

MarcM

Starting to get Involved
#1
Hi all,

First post and a quick question.

Is it normal practice to write a non-conformance report for any supplier parts received on a customer approved Concession?

Thanks

MM
 

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
If there was a concession/waiver, chances are the part was nonconforming, thus, yes, someone should have identified the nonconforming situation, typically the supplier, with the AS-IS condition, in support of the request for concession.

Welcome to The Cove.
 

MarcM

Starting to get Involved
#3
If there was a concession/waiver, chances are the part was nonconforming, thus, yes, someone should have identified the nonconforming situation, typically the supplier, with the AS-IS condition, in support of the request for concession.

Welcome to The Cove.
Thank you :)

Looking at it from another point of view. Since the Concession states the new condition of the part (although it is non-conforming to the original print) and it has been signed by the relevant parties, doesn't that now make the part conform to this new "IS" requirement on the Concession? and therefore is not Non-Conforming? Just a thought...
 

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Staff member
Super Moderator
#4
doesn't that now make the part conform to this new "IS" requirement on the Concession? and therefore is not Non-Conforming? Just a thought...
Not sure if there is a hidden agenda here.

The ISO 9000 definition of concession:
permission to use or release a product or service that does not conform to specified requirements.

If the part were conforming, that would not be a need for a concession.

If the "AS-IS" condition is acceptable for a limited run, the concession should specify the limitation. If the "AS-IS" condition is good forever, the product specification should be revised accordingly.
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
Trusted
#5
To me you either go down the concession branch or the non-conforming branch. If it's a concession it's usually proactive. A problem was noticed and rather than fix, the product is used with the defect. It is fixed at a later time. If it's non conforming, you need to fix it and do root cause analysis and corrective action. Sometimes you might do both.
 

MarcM

Starting to get Involved
#6
Not sure if there is a hidden agenda here.

The ISO 9000 definition of concession:
permission to use or release a product or service that does not conform to specified requirements.

If the part were conforming, that would not be a need for a concession.

If the "AS-IS" condition is acceptable for a limited run, the concession should specify the limitation. If the "AS-IS" condition is good forever, the product specification should be revised accordingly.
To me you either go down the concession branch or the non-conforming branch. If it's a concession it's usually proactive. A problem was noticed and rather than fix, the product is used with the defect. It is fixed at a later time. If it's non conforming, you need to fix it and do root cause analysis and corrective action. Sometimes you might do both.
Fair point. I was under the same mindset but thought there might be a different view point. So, a concession identifies non-conforming part which means a non-conforming report must be generated.
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
Trusted
#7
Fair point. I was under the same mindset but thought there might be a different view point. So, a concession identifies non-conforming part which means a non-conforming report must be generated.
NO, not necessarily.

Example. I have a part made in 304 Stainless steel but I can't find material for it. I can get 316 SS which is an upgrade in most cases. I can get a concession for the material switch on this order and go back to 304 next time. There was nothing non-conforming about it.

Or, I am making a part that just doesn't want to come into spec. Let's say it will take a lengthy tooling/machine repair. I can ask for a concession to allow the out of spec condition on this order to give me time to fix the tooling/machine for the next order. Maybe I issue a non-conformance or Corrective action, maybe not.

As distinguished by, I found a defect in final inspection (or the customer found it). I can issue a non-conformance, corrective action, and all of that. In the meantime, I can also maybe get a concession to use as is for now.

So short answer is "It Depends."
 

MarcM

Starting to get Involved
#8
NO, not necessarily.

Example. I have a part made in 304 Stainless steel but I can't find material for it. I can get 316 SS which is an upgrade in most cases. I can get a concession for the material switch on this order and go back to 304 next time. There was nothing non-conforming about it.

Or, I am making a part that just doesn't want to come into spec. Let's say it will take a lengthy tooling/machine repair. I can ask for a concession to allow the out of spec condition on this order to give me time to fix the tooling/machine for the next order. Maybe I issue a non-conformance or Corrective action, maybe not.

As distinguished by, I found a defect in final inspection (or the customer found it). I can issue a non-conformance, corrective action, and all of that. In the meantime, I can also maybe get a concession to use as is for now.

So short answer is "It Depends."
That is kind of what I was thinking of along the lines of originally.

If a concession is approved with an "IS" condition, doesn't that become the "new" standard the part has to adhere to for the purpose of that concession? I mean its still deviating from the original type data but its conforming to the new agreed condition so does that make it conforming enough to not generate a Non-Conforming Report?
 

Ian_Morris

Involved In Discussions
#9
What an interesting discussion.

For my £0.02 it really depends on the reason that the concession is required and whether it was in your control or not.

Using the examples from Golfman, if you are using a material because your stock management was the cause, there is clearly a non-conformance in the process and that should be recorded and addressed, however if the issue is outside of your control, i.e. it is due to an urgent client requirement that does not allow for the ordering profile it would not be. Where a machine will not make the part, then there is a clear non-conformance as either the process is not stable enough to produce the part and this should have been identified in the planning phase, or there is a defect with the machine that could indicate a problem with preventive maintenance schedules.

Clearly every case is different based on the merits of the circumstance, but that is why we have continuous improvement and corrective action processes to reduce variation and improve performance.
 

MarcM

Starting to get Involved
#10
What an interesting discussion.

For my £0.02 it really depends on the reason that the concession is required and whether it was in your control or not.

Using the examples from Golfman, if you are using a material because your stock management was the cause, there is clearly a non-conformance in the process and that should be recorded and addressed, however if the issue is outside of your control, i.e. it is due to an urgent client requirement that does not allow for the ordering profile it would not be. Where a machine will not make the part, then there is a clear non-conformance as either the process is not stable enough to produce the part and this should have been identified in the planning phase, or there is a defect with the machine that could indicate a problem with preventive maintenance schedules.

Clearly every case is different based on the merits of the circumstance, but that is why we have continuous improvement and corrective action processes to reduce variation and improve performance.
Good point. It really does vary depending on situation.

Lets say it was decided not to write a Non-Conforming Report for the parts on Concession.
Parts are then stored in stock next to other conforming parts of same part number.
Parts are sent to production and during assembly/inspection it is noticed that these parts are "different" and as such scrutinized where it is determined that the parts are not conforming to print.
The part may then be put on a Non-Conforming Report, unless there is a process to look up that lot# in a Concession database and see if it came under a Concession. Otherwise you would need a method to identify Concession parts from good parts.

Now, if the parts on Concession were put on a Non-Conforming Report during receiving inspection, then that lot# would not be rejected again for same issue in production.

So question here is: should parts on Concession be put on a Non-Conforming Report regardless?
 
Top