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Non conformity, do nothing? Employee experiencing "hard times"

#1
Hello everybody
I just had a case and want to hear your opinions about the right treatment.
One non conformity was detected, which caused to do some reworks.
A NCR was raised, from here a CA was needed.
Not too costly, in the analysis the root cause was problems in employee .
This man, always very willing to perform his job, very compromised, rarely makes a mistake, in this case was his fault.
Root cause= having hard times recently, no clear mind, no peace, that was the cause.
What the action plan can be?
I find no way to do something, since it was a very isolated case.
Could I apply just a correction (no root cause), turn the page and go on?
Maybe a contention action, to give his task to other person in good conditions?
Or just to document the case and do nothing.
What do you do in this cases?

Thanks
 

Randy

Super Moderator
#2
Tough and very real.......Fix the problem and try to fix the person without connecting the 2. Very possibly position or task reassignment after he's talked with but only if absolutely necessary...talked with and not to about solutions by someone of trust and concern.

This is a process concern, not a people failing.

"Each and everyone of us can push the incorrect button at any time and pickle the pods" (ask and I'll share)
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#3
It looks like you've found the root cause, and are looking for the "what do I do now?".

You can choose to do nothing...document why you chose to do nothing, and move on. "Oops happens".
You can choose to "document it in employee file"...silly crap, I wouldn't based on your description.
Or you can look into how to prohibit the NC from reoccurring...
From Randy's quote...make it impossible to push the incorrect button...
Now it's down to Cost/Benefit...decide to say "It doesn't happen often, and we choose to let it slide", or invest in prohibiting its recurrence.
Most of the time, I find it not worth the cost.

From your description...I would likely choose to let it slide...once...maybe even twice. I would also see what I could do (if anything) to help the person out...sounds like he/she could use it...even if it was just a couple paid days off, or something more pertinent to the person.

HTH
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#6
Good day qualprod,

It appears you are describing a process that is wholly dependent on the employee doing the right thing 100% of the time.

If that is the case, how does your organization design processes in such a way as to prevent failure?

You did not describe this individual's procedural responsibilities, so my response must be vague.
 
#7
Good day qualprod,

It appears you are describing a process that is wholly dependent on the employee doing the right thing 100% of the time.

If that is the case, how does your organization design processes in such a way as to prevent failure?

You did not describe this individual's procedural responsibilities, so my response must be vague.
Thanks Jenny
Yes is a process which depends of the human capability.
But really I don't know how a system managed by people could be Perfect.
Even if it were automated (machines, robots), the error still can happen.
How can you workaround an occasional human error?
Thanks
 

skb76

Starting to get Involved
#9
All,

Since as Qualprod mentioned it is isolated case + non major issues, ..
.. if possible x raise the nc (better give OFI)


#Could I apply just a correction (no root cause), turn the page and go on?
(once nc is raised, root cause IS A MUST!) ..my guess

but in case the nc already raised, root cause is already identify...
(based on the scenario) ..
maybe just write a report (retraining/re-orientation) to that personnel
;(although real training NO TAKE PLACE :confused:); to close the nc!
 

Mike S.

An Early 'Cover'
Trusted
#10
Sometimes correction and move on is appropriate.

I would not say root cause is never the employee, but I would say it is much more rare than most folks think. I believe I started a thread on that subject many years ago that has gotten many replies over the years.

At one time or another each of us will be going through a difficult time and screw-up something as a result. This quote is over 100 years old: "Be kind; everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle." It is as true today as it was back then.

We can try to make our processes employee-error-proof but it will never completely happen. All we can do is try to be aware of human factors, and ensure we apply as much support, training, redundancy, and error-proofing as is practical given the consequences of an error.
 
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