Office Dress Code

Cari Spears

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I'm constantly baffled by what is considered acceptable dress in professional offices these days in the many companies I visit and in the last two places I've worked. I see clevage, bare shoulders, bare mid-drifts, bare legs and semi-bare feet. Since when has it been acceptable to wear flip-flops to the office - even if it's casual Friday? I wanna know. :confused:

Does the front office staff at your organization have a dress code? I have to admit, I'm pretty old school about work dress. I don't think even open toed dress shoes are ok - let alone flip-flops - and I would never show up for work in a skirt with bare legs.
 

SteelMaiden

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It's a good thing that the majors get a bigger strike zone than the outfits we see here.:notme:
 

ScottK

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I'm constantly baffled by what is considered acceptable dress in professional offices these days in the many companies I visit and in the last two places I've worked. I see clevage, bare shoulders, bare mid-drifts, bare legs and semi-bare feet. Since when has it been acceptable to wear flip-flops to the office - even if it's casual Friday? I wanna know. :confused:

Does the front office staff at your organization have a dress code? I have to admit, I'm pretty old school about work dress. I don't think even open toed dress shoes are ok - let alone flip-flops - and I would never show up for work in a skirt with bare legs.

Where I currently work everyone makes forays into the factory so flip flops and sandals are completely out for everyone at any time.
And it's a casual dress code so the women don't often wear dressy open toed shoes - only our HR manager does really, because she still dresses more formally on a daily basis.

Since I've been here the dress code M-Th has been business casual and Friday was dress down day.
In the last two years it's gotten more lax. I can pretty much wear jeans whenever I want... as long as my shirt isn't a t-shirt and the jears are clean and not ripped up.
There is a paragraph in the Employee Handbook but it's ignored at this point.
Good think I don't audit to it.
 

Cari Spears

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Clean should be the key word.
I disagree. Professional should be the key word. Cleanliness is part of dressing professionally.

sorin said:
Would you like women to dress like this?
I'm talking about young women whose boobs are pushed up to their chin and sporting mini skirts (without nylons) and flip flops. That's a pretty far leap you made.

I'm also talking about dressing professionally in a professional business environment. These girls aren't tending bar or walking a run-way.
 

Cari Spears

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Since I've been here the dress code M-Th has been business casual and Friday was dress down day.
In the last two years it's gotten more lax. I can pretty much wear jeans whenever I want... as long as my shirt isn't a t-shirt and the jears are clean and not ripped up.
We too have a business casual dress code M-TH and casual day Friday when we can wear jeans.
 

Cari Spears

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It's a good thing that the majors get a bigger strike zone than the outfits we see here.:notme:
:lol:

I just looked through an old thread in the related threads and found this:

SteelMaiden said:
From the viewpoint of a long-time plant person who only recently got an official office in the office....

Super dressy offices seem to put up perceived barriers between departments.
Casual but professional seem to pull the barriers down, aid in allowing interaction between the "us and them"
Super casual starts to lose professionalism and respect.
I agree completely. I think business casual is probably the way to go. You can look professional without being super dressed up.
 

SteelMaiden

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There are lots of clothes that can be clean and still not be appropriate for work. If clean was the only criteria, a g-string and a pair of pasties would suffice.:rolleyes:

I can live with bare legs and open toed shoes, I truly beleive that anyone here trying to wear nylons would end up in the hospital from heat stroke, but skirts should actually cover up the underwear (which should be required wear, not optional attire) and for men, pants should not be belted below the butt-cheeks. In no case should underwear be seen or considered part of the fashion statement.

I hope I didn't cross the line of appropriate G-rated posting?
 
S

somerqc

We are allowed to wear jeans as most personnel end up on the production floor for a significant portion of the day (re: >25%).

However, we are not allowed any of the following:

1. Torn or tattered jeans or pants
2. No shorts at all
3. Managers/Supervisors in business shirts (re: collared)
4. Like Scott - we have steel toed shoe requirements on the floor so shoes aren't an issue
5. No t-shirts (unless it is company logo wear)

That's about it - but it is followed. We don't end up with too many attire issues at all.

We did have a problem at my old place with one manager. YIKES! She looked like she should have been "working a corner" if you know what I mean. I wonder if her attire was foreshadowing what was to come (she was caught forging checks)....she was sent home MULTIPLE times for inappropriate dress in the office. Some people just don't get it...
 

Cari Spears

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We did have a problem at my old place with one manager. YIKES! She looked like she should have been "working a corner" if you know what I mean. I wonder if her attire was foreshadowing what was to come (she was caught forging checks)....she was sent home MULTIPLE times for inappropriate dress in the office. Some people just don't get it...
:lol: At my last company, the office manager (owner's wife :tg:) regularly came to work in leather pants and always wore low cut tops and push up bras. She also frequently wore a tank top or camisole-style spaghetti strap types of tops.
 
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