Office Dress Code

SteelMaiden

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I tend to think that a lot of people need to learn how to dress, whether they are at work, or out in public.
 

Cari Spears

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but skirts should actually cover up the underwear (which should be required wear, not optional attire) and for men, pants should not be belted below the butt-cheeks. In no case should underwear be seen or considered part of the fashion statement.
I was auditing a potential vendor about a year ago. The receptionist couldn't reach the manager we were there to see so she came from behind the desk to run out to the plant to get him. She was wearing a white tank top with nothing over it and a very tight, very sheer little pink miniskirt and white, plastic flip-flops. You could make out perfeclty that she was also wearing a coordinated bra and panty set in light blue. This was a machine shop.

SteelMaiden said:
I can live with bare legs and open toed shoes, I truly beleive that anyone here trying to wear nylons would end up in the hospital from heat stroke,
Good point - I guess I can see that climate would have to be taken into consideration.
 
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G

Groo3

We too have a business casual dress code M-TH and casual day Friday when we can wear jeans.

Our casual Monday-Thursday dress code includes jeans, as long as they are not ripped or worn below the waist. Dress shirts or polo shirts with a collar are acceptable. For the women, conservative dresses (knee length or longer) are acceptable. No open toe shoes are allowed while working, however wearing open toe shoes while travelling between your locker and your car is OK. Safety attire is expected where appropriate (areas that require safety attire are marked by numerous signs throughout the plant). Personally, I think cleavage would be a welcome change, corporate policy however is to keep clevage or anything else that may be perceived as innappropriate under wraps.

For us, casual Friday means you can wear that Hawiian shirt if you want or wear a shirt without a collar. PS: I have my favorite Hawiian shirt on right now ;-)

When we know we will have customers or corporate personnel onsite, casual business attire does not include jeans at all.

Well, that's it for our current status... Back when I first started here, well that's another story for at least an "R" rated discussion thread.;)
 

ScottK

Not out of the crisis
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I actually got written up in a review at past job that I "did not wear a tie often enough".... even though there was no requirement and, IMO, people who work around moving equipment (which I often did at that point when helping my inspectors and invesitgating failures) should not wear ties...


There are a lot of women employed at my current place of work but only a few are office staff and they all dress conservatively. The women out in production have to wear lab coats and long pants.
So too little clothing is really a non-issue.
 

Cari Spears

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I actually got written up in a review at past job that I "did not wear a tie often enough".... even though there was no requirement
What a silly thing to write someone up for!

ScottK said:
and, IMO, people who work around moving equipment (which I often did at that point when helping my inspectors and invesitgating failures) should not wear ties...
I used to work at a place in the early 1990s that stamped, welded, bonded, etc. The manufacturing supervisors had to wear a uniform of grey pants and white shirts (Cintas) and they had to wear a burgundy tie. Their ties had to be clip on so that if they did get caught in something, it would just come right off.:lol:
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
:lol: At my last company, the office manager (owner's wife :tg:) regularly came to work in leather pants and always wore low cut tops and push up bras. She also frequently wore a tank top or camisole-style spaghetti strap types of tops.
I bet two doughnuts she was a second wife. Was her language as coarse as her clothing choice?

I tend to think that a lot of people need to learn how to dress, whether they are at work, or out in public.

That learning starts in school [should start!], but I have been dismayed at some clothing choices at high schools and colleges where I give presentations. I can almost understand the "goth" look, but the piercings are downright scary. The Tiajuana street tart look completely mystifies me. For a while, I was apprehensive because I had heard stories of students catching professors in a kind of "badger game" for better grades. Whatever happened to peter pan collars and jumpers?
I was auditing a potential vendor about a year ago. The receptionist couldn't reach the manager we were there to see so she came from behind the desk to run out to the plant to get him. She was wearing a white tank top with nothing over it and a very tight, very sheer little pink miniskirt and white, plastic flip-flops. You could make out perfeclty that she was also wearing a coordinated bra and panty set in light blue. This was a machine shop.
My impression when I encounter a receptionist dressed like that is "she sure wasn't hired for her phone voice!"

Personally, I think slacks and shirts/blouses or polo shirts are good business casual wear for either gender - kind of sexist to ask women to wear skirts or dresses (I do prefer trousers with a crease to baggy or saggy ones. If the belt can't keep the trousers up, wear suspenders! Why not Bermuda length shorts for either gender when the weather or interior temperature call for cooler clothing (keeping safety in mind)?

In my investment banking days, I wore suits (not sport coats) every day as a kind of uniform. When I ran a contract machining company, I kept a full suit, shirt, tie, shoes, etc. in a closet in my office "for emergencies," but normally wore slacks and an open collar oxford shirt (with dressy, highly polished steel toe oxfords for safety when I went into the shop (frequently during the day.) We kept a full array of lab coats for visitors plus those ugly metatarsal and toe guards to protect their clothing from damage and themselves from injury. In ten years, our only reportable injury for employee or visitor was an unthinking visitor who stuck his bare hand in a bin of chips and ribbons from machining 304 stainless and cut his hand so badly we had to take him to a medical clinic for four stitches and a tetanus booster shot.

Our employees wore comfortable clothing and shop workers all had 3/4 length oil resistant smocks to protect their clothing. Mostly, though, the shop was as clean as a Mazak showroom for new machine tools. Our building was 100% air conditioned, so shorts were not an issue. Office staff, male and female, dressed similarly to me, but we did NOT have a defined dress code beyond the smocks and lab coats for working or visiting the shop floor.

I guess the term "professional dress" is kind of fluid, depending on the location, type of business, and job title. When I visit a large corporate law office, I expect an attractive receptionist dressed in a skirted suit (rarely a suit with trousers) who speaks in modulated tones and remembers names of anyone who visits more than twice. The entire tone is of a hostess who greets a guest and makes the guest as comfortable as possible while waiting to see the intended lawyer. Pretty much the same thing is common at investment banks and large commercial banks. As the scale of the business gets smaller in number of employees and dollar volume of business, the dress code usually becomes more relaxed and the front line employees meeting visitors and clients are not as formal and well-trained and efficient (the idea of efficiency I'm thinking of is that the efficient ones never seem to be working hard at managing the ebb and flow of visitors while the less efficient ones make it plain they are struggling to remain calm and efficient when something out of the ordinary occurs.)

Sometimes, of course, the work force in a given location may be so poorly educated to understand the difference between trashy glitz and clothing acceptable for business, or paid so poorly they can't afford "professional clothing or safety clothing" - that's when organization-supplied apparel is important. With a little forethought, the apparel can have enough variety so employees don't begin to think they are faceless cogs in a machine.

Management, of course, is ultimately responsible for the quality and efficiency of front line staff, starting from the employment screening process to formal and informal evaluation by direct observation and indirect comments from visitors and coworkers. A clear set of guidelines with empowerment to use initiative in resolving "upsets" seems to work best when the employees have been pre-screened for skills and abilities.

A front line employee who understands his/her appearance and demeanor can influence the visitor's impression of the organization is an asset to the organization as long as the organization does not alienate such an employee who can easily turn from a beneficial greeter to a vengeful saboteur. Management needs to help employees understand the value and continually evaluate to assure the employees are sticking with the program.
 

SteelMaiden

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Trusted Information Resource
Wes, you say that appropriate dress education should start in school, but that is not true. Appropriate dress education begins at home, and in our neighborhoods. Mine have known all thier lives that some things are acceptable. They look at the way their peers dress and question how they will ever get a job. They may not be perfect, but at least I know that they will not disgust the general public with their clothing choices.

Goth? Hey, we have some kids around here that can rock the look no matter where they are. These are the kids that I can get behind, they have some sense and know when enough is enough.
 
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