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Order and Need for Professional Certifications

SpinDr99

Involved In Discussions
#11
My experience is that any time you advance your degrees or certifications, the company sees that as your commitment towards yourself and your career. Smaller companies like to "brag" that they have someone with certification(s) in ....

Larger companies will want to see that as requirements for the position. I was shown the Quality career path years ago and took classes for certifications and degrees, especially when the company picked up the tab. I never looked back at my career thinking "what if I had gone into ..."

Look at your current position, go for the certifications that are a good fit so the company will justify that because it's directly related to your work. I especially recommend going for Lead Auditor/Assessor certifications (yes, "Lead") whenever possible. It diversifies your skills and opens doors, possibly making you management material. Maybe even think of reaching for the CQM/QE certification.

Consulting and auditing are great if your life will allow you to manage the travel needed (especially if you work for a certification body). Time away from family also needs to be considered. Above all, you should look at a career in a field you enjoy and believe in, and not just one that you're good at.
 
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SpinDr99

Involved In Discussions
#12
Forgot to mention that if you can get into a regulated industry (ex. medical device, automotive, aerospace), your earning potential will increase.
 
#14
Great site and great questions and answers here...:bigwave:

To piggyback on the OP's thoughts, my goals are to learn more, and meet people and bounce ideas off one another. Even share some frustrations of daily life as "the quality guy".

Currently and previously, I suffered from "lone ranger" syndrome.

The value of the role is not understood or appreciated, in part due to my inability to communicate that to the correct people.

I love getting to the bottom of issues and complaints and being a part of a team, but that is not the case.

My industry is consulting but my background is manufacturing.

Sorry for hijacking.

Thoughts?

Thanks!
Jonathan
 

dsanabria

Quite Involved in Discussions
#15
Great site and great questions and answers here...:bigwave:

To piggyback on the OP's thoughts, my goals are to learn more, and meet people and bounce ideas off one another. Even share some frustrations of daily life as "the quality guy".

Currently and previously, I suffered from "lone ranger" syndrome.

The value of the role is not understood or appreciated, in part due to my inability to communicate that to the correct people.

I love getting to the bottom of issues and complaints and being a part of a team, but that is not the case.

My industry is consulting but my background is manufacturing.

Sorry for hijacking.

Thoughts?

Thanks!
Jonathan
Welcome - any particular question?
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#16
In my experience from obtaining several certs but maintaining only one, obtaining quality certification brings more value in what is learned than a direct "edge" in hiring or promotion. That said, there is something to be said for taking the initiative to better ones self.

To actually learn the subject versus just pass the test, I use the ASQ Handbooks. I used to use Pyzdek's books but I don't think they are publishing them anymore. I have twice been a member of ASQ's exam editing team for Inspector and found, whether they meant it or not, the answers were most often available in the ASQ Handbook on that subject. And they make decent desk references.

I have seen employers value the 6 Sigma certifications more than the others, unless you want to directly qualify for a position such as Quality Engineer. I did twice qualify for (and then be hired for) auditing jobs based on having passed the CQA. Supplier Quality seems to be a common point of entry into the QA field, I suppose because the job is difficult and the turnover subsequently is high.

ASQ has a page that lists what the certifications are about and what is needed to qualify for them. It is part of their Certification Catalog page.

I hope this helps!
 

Ettore

Quite Involved in Discussions
#17
Your education and experience are more valuable.

From a financial point of view - become a consultant and or an externa; auditors.

While I am not diminishing the value of ASQ - it is worth noting that only the large company glances at it - with the thought that you could read and pass a test. The small companies - well, they are not impressed. IMHO
Bravo

Inviato dal mio SM-A520F utilizzando Tapatalk
 

Jessterish

Starting to get Involved
#20
So you don't see SS certs as being useful for the leadership side? Or did you think they just made more sense on the technical side, and didn't want to have them for both?
 
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