Painted Surfaces - IMDS ELV Declaring Harzardous Substances Program

J

juliov

#1
Hi Fellow Quality pros, comment on this:

how would a painted surface be entered in the IMDS database to comply
> with the reportable hazardous substance ELV program. Our company
> manufactures steel clips, one side of the steel coil is polyester
> painted the other side is PVC coated. It is confusing because how
> could we know what is inside the dry paint. Let me know if some of our
> other quality pros can help. let me know if you got this message. This
> is my first request for assistance to other quality pros and need to
> know if I am doing it right. Also, where should I look for answers to
> this posting. Send me an email with directions.

Thanks, JP:bigwave:
 
A

ashwin_kumar942

#2
Re: IMDS ELV Declaring harzardous substances program

Hi JP,

Hi Fellow Quality pros, comment on this:

how would a painted surface be entered in the IMDS database to comply
> with the reportable hazardous substance ELV program. Our company
> manufactures steel clips, one side of the steel coil is polyester
> painted the other side is PVC coated. It is confusing because how
> could we know what is inside the dry paint. Let me know if some of our
> other quality pros can help. let me know if you got this message. This
> is my first request for assistance to other quality pros and need to
> know if I am doing it right. Also, where should I look for answers to
> this posting. Send me an email with directions.

I read your above question it is quite simple...you just need to report the material as per the manufacturing process....well regarding the dry paint it will get evaporated and you report the material which is finally present in the component. Painted material will be reported as a material sheet...If you have any further issues can send me the thread again...
 
#3
Re: IMDS ELV Declaring harzardous substances program

How can you know what's inside the dry paint?

What's inside the paint is everything other than the volitiles that were emitted during the drying/curing process.

Check the MSDS sheet or better yet obtain a Certified Product Data Sheet for the paint. Do the simple math of subtracting the volitiles from the solids and there you have it.
 

Kales Veggie

People: The Vital Few
#4
In the IMDS system (www.mdsystem.com) there are several paint MDS published. Take a look at those. Ask your paint supplier for an MSDS or certified material cert and compare.

Anyone with access to the IMDS system can find this, using the search function and selecting "published MDS". These are public data sheets that suppliers have published.

--------------
Example of a paint (no idea if it is close to what you are using).

JAMESON PAINT
SWVF-9046-NU1_ Waterborne Coating for Plastic (Dry Solids)
Polyurethane resin
Silica, amorphous fumed
Polyethylene
Titanium-dioxide
Carbon black
Triiron tetraoxide
2,4,7,9-Tetramethyldec-5-yne-4,7-diol
Urea-formaldehyde resin
29H,31H-Phthalocyaninato(2-)-N29,N30,N31,N32 copper
8,18-Dichloro-5,15-diethyl-5,15-dihydrodiindolo

------
 
A

ashwin_kumar942

#5
In the MSDS all the material properties and other details like curing temp and flash point and fire point temp like those informations will be available...well we can have the material testing testing report in which detailed breakdown of substance will be highlighted....
 
#6
Ashwin, you got it not quite right. To be honest, in the US some of the information you've talked about may not be in the MSDS...........Kales what you provided as an example is near useless because it doesn't mention quantities or volitiles...good try though guys

juliov....I'm an EHS professional and have had to solve this problem myself in the past...I've got hands on, so I ain't guessing. I'm not any smarter, but I do have experience.

The best method mathematically is to use the CPDS...this document many times must be specifically requested from the manufacturer. I used to have file cabinets full of them for all kinds of paints, solvent and olther coating compounds because of a US EPA Title 5 air permit under Subpart JJ that I managed and other air permits I controlled. If you don't have or can't get a CPDS then the MSDS will do, but you have to go to the high side numbers.

The best non-mathematical method is probably spectographic analysis where some of the material is burnt and the light computer analyzed for the constuents of the burnt material....it can get expensive

There are other methods to analyze your material but you better have cash by the bushel basket.
 
A

ashwin_kumar942

#7
Thanks a Lot Randy..It was nice to get to know about such things from an experienced people like...Can you Please exlain me what CPDS means..I am working on the Material Compliance activites it will be helpful for me to get a guidance from experienced heads...

How MSDS replaces CPDS...How can we get to know about this document..


I had gone through Spectometer analysis for Hexa Chrome removal process.. which is done for the Material coating testing I believe..what other things are specifically done for material coating analysis...
 
#9
CPDS = Certified Product Data Sheet

All an MSDS will provide (if at all) will be the chemical constituents in a range like 210-280 mg/l, which is pretty broad. A CPDS provides the exact amount of a material, eg 250 mg/l. Many paints and other coating will have a CPDS available from the manufacturer, some can even be obtained right off the internet.

Very few "non-professionals" know of the existence of this document and rely on the MSDS which is not required to be 100% accurate and only has to contain minimal information. In the US the MSDS is actually a safety document primarily intended for use by employers to help them notify employees of chemical hazards in the workplace.
 
B

bgwiehle

#10
How would a painted surface be entered in the IMDS database to comply with the reportable hazardous substance ELV program. Our company manufactures steel clips, one side of the steel coil is polyester painted the other side is PVC coated. It is confusing because how could we know what is inside the dry paint....
IMDS reporting requires the composition of the part as shipped to the [OEM] customer. You need to ensure that any volatiles that were in the raw material that are no longer in the finished product, are not included in the material reported. Depending on the application processes, there may be other chemical changes (cure, polymerization, etc.) that would change the make-up of the paints.

The composition of the raw material may not reflect that final material. Also, an elemental break-down of paints & coatings would not usually be appropriate.

The proper method for determining the coating composition is to ask your materials supplier(s) to submit the MDS* for the (final) material. Many are already published and can be found by searching the IMDS database. These MDSs would then be incorporated in your submissions to your customer.

* MDS = material data sheet, not the same as MSDS

B.G. Wiehle
IMDS user
 

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