PPAP for Disposable Tooling

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Baki195

HI Everyone,

I'd like to get some advice on a tooling situation that I am seeing for the first time. Let me give preface that this is not for the auto industry.

I have a supplier that I will be buying casted parts from. They will cast prototype parts first and then assuming that those prototypes are approved, they will create a master tool based on the prototypes. Once that master tool is made, all subsequent tools will be made from that master tool.

Where this gets more complex is the subsequent tools are all disposable tools that have an expiration date (90 days from when the tool is made) regardless of the number of times that it has been used.

My question is, if you have multiple tools (let's say 10-20) that are coming out every 90 days, do you really go through a full qualification process on each tool? Master tool is assumed to stay the same each time a new tool is made.

Thanks ahead of time.
 
W

Wilderness Woody

Not a lot of detail regarding the reasoning behind the 90 day tool life limit to comment, but I see this as a matter for Risk and Traceability assessment to determine if you need to qualify each and every tool rather than a process. Who accepts the risk for failure?

If the multiple tools are made and inspected within a range for tolerances and functional characteristics, you could create a set of tools at the furthest edges of allowable tolerances and determine if parts made from those tools are within acceptable process limits to confirm a functional equivalency between any tool. If there is too much variability from the output, the process may not be deemed capable without refining the tool tolerances.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
HI Everyone,

I'd like to get some advice on a tooling situation that I am seeing for the first time. Let me give preface that this is not for the auto industry.

I have a supplier that I will be buying casted parts from. They will cast prototype parts first and then assuming that those prototypes are approved, they will create a master tool based on the prototypes. Once that master tool is made, all subsequent tools will be made from that master tool.

Where this gets more complex is the subsequent tools are all disposable tools that have an expiration date (90 days from when the tool is made) regardless of the number of times that it has been used.

My question is, if you have multiple tools (let's say 10-20) that are coming out every 90 days, do you really go through a full qualification process on each tool? Master tool is assumed to stay the same each time a new tool is made.

Thanks ahead of time.

You say that this doesn't involve the automotive industry but you don't say where the PPAP requirements are coming from. Many companies design their own part approval process and call it "PPAP."
 
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