AS9100 News PPAP in the Aerospace Sector - What is it? AS9145 - Requirements for Advanced Product Quality Planning and Production Part Approval Process

Sidney Vianna

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The Production Part Approval Process (PPAP), originally devised for the Automotive Sector has also been rolled out, as part of the Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) protocol in the Aviation, Space & Defense Industry, and codified via the AS9145 Standard. The attached document, available from the IAQG Supply Chain Management Handbook (SCMH), gives a good overview of the aero-versions of APQP and PPAP expectations and processes.
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Sidney Vianna

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I was wondering does AS9145 now replace AS9102?
No. AS9102 remains as I mentioned that first article is just one component of PPAP.

AS9145 is a much broader document, beyond PPAP and dealing with advanced quality planning. We are witnessing cross fertilization of quality techniques from the automotive industry to the aerospace sector.
 
#6
The question I would have:

What does everyone think of this, do you think it is a good idea? Either answer leads to the question, why or why not?
 

Sidney Vianna

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What does everyone think of this, do you think it is a good idea?
Good question.

In my estimation, the intelligent deployment of AS9145 should be carefully exercised, focusing on organizations in the supply chain that can truly embrace and follow the process in a value-added manner. If they start flowing this down, willy nilly, it could be extremely burdensome for a small machine shop that barely has the resources in place to deal with the current array of requirements.

Nevertheless, as the material from the IAQG webinar (that I attached to the first post in this thread) shows, there is potential for significant improvement in quality and cost avoidance, following the methodology.
 
#9
My bug with AS9145 is not the process, I do like it. My concern is how businesses are bringing in automotive 'lean' experts into Aerospace companies and thus applying controlled conditions for SPC, MSA etc etc..
making 10000000 widgets in an automotive organisation is perfect for these analysis tools but trying to apply the same methodology to a complicated machined and processed item with a batch number of 3 is pointless and the fancy bell curves, control charts tell you nothing about the control of a process, there is just not enough continual data and not enough error variability calculation considered....

I am all in on working with automotive experts in aerospace to understand how we can apply the right techniques to assess process control and conformity but it would be good if the automotive types could be a little more understanding of complex low production product.

Ok, probably not the best forum to have a little gripe, but it certainly felt good..
 

Sidney Vianna

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My concern is how businesses are bringing in automotive 'lean' experts into Aerospace companies and thus applying controlled conditions for SPC, MSA etc etc..
making 10000000 widgets in an automotive organisation is perfect for these analysis tools but trying to apply the same methodology to a complicated machined and processed item with a batch number of 3 is pointless and the fancy bell curves, control charts tell you nothing about the control of a process, there is just not enough continual data and not enough error variability calculation considered....
(y)

Exactly on point. Let's remember that Ford sells a F-150 pickup truck every 30 seconds, while Boeing assembles around 52 B737's per month.

So, the IAQG has to be very careful not to let the AIAG permeate the aero sector with tools meant for massive volume production, which would make no sense in the context of the industry. Context is paramount.
 

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