QMS and ISO 9001

imkegg

Registered
Hey everyone,

First time posting on here so I'll keep it short and sweet.

I've recently taken on the position of Quality Manager at a small machine/job shop and have no previous experience in this position. My background is welder/fabricator and some time spent in a research facility. We are in the process of building a quality department and interested in applying for ISO9001 in the next 3 years. Does anyone have any advice on what to do, not to do, common pitfalls, or anything else that we can benefit from?

Sorry for the broad post but I'm just trying to get a good idea of starting point for us.

Thanks!
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Hey everyone,

First time posting on here so I'll keep it short and sweet.

I've recently taken on the position of Quality Manager at a small machine/job shop and have no previous experience in this position. My background is welder/fabricator and some time spent in a research facility. We are in the process of building a quality department and interested in applying for ISO9001 in the next 3 years. Does anyone have any advice on what to do, not to do, common pitfalls, or anything else that we can benefit from?

Sorry for the broad post but I'm just trying to get a good idea of starting point for us.

Thanks!

imkegg,

Welcome. You are in the right place and need not worry. Many folk who visit the Cove are willing to share their experience of doing this for themselves and other small organizations.

You will find reports from decades of Covers who have developed their organization’s process-based management system so it is largely based on what they already do (already implemented!).

This should get you started:

Implementation of QMS

We look forward to your further questions as you progress.

Best wishes,

John
 

Tagin

Trusted Information Resource
Two things come to mind:
  • Sketch out your QMS to fit your business and your needs first, and then compare it (e.g., gap analysis) to 9001. If you make a '9001 system' first and then try to fit it to your business, it will be twice the work and probably not as good a QMS.
  • Familiarize yourself with PDCA (plan-do-check-act) (0.3.2 in 9001:2015). The standard is in PDCA format, and understanding that flow can help considerably in understanding how the pieces fit together.
 

qualitymanagerTT

Involved In Discussions
... Does anyone have any advice on what to do, not to do, common pitfalls, or anything else that we can benefit from?

Sorry for the broad post but I'm just trying to get a good idea of starting point for us.

Thanks!

In addition to the previous posters, the authors of ISO 9001 have a good document on how to start (particularly pages 8 & 9):
"Selection and use of the ISO 9000 family of standards" (I had the link, but don't yet have 10 posts, so I can't post it - you'll have to search).

And there are other free documents to access on the ISO/TC 176/SC 2 website (same problem - Elsmar is blocking me from posting the website).

And there used to be (I've been inactive since 2005 to fairly recently) lots of consultants in the forum who would be happy to give you specific advice.
 

blackholequasar

The Cheerful Diabetic
My advice is to outline your QMS around ISO 9001, but do not directly align it. I work for a company that aligned their SOPs and Work Instructions 100% to each section of the 9001:2008 standard... and when the standard changed, as they do, all their numbering sequences changed. This is something I have honestly seen a lot of smaller companies do. So I would categorize it as a common pitfall!
 

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qualitymanagerTT

Involved In Discussions
My advice is to outline your QMS around ISO 9001, but do not directly align it. I work for a company that aligned their SOPs and Work Instructions 100% to each section of the 9001:2008 standard... and when the standard changed, as they do, all their numbering sequences changed. This is something I have honestly seen a lot of smaller companies do. So I would categorize it as a common pitfall!
1) I am interested in the triangle you posted, and at which level messages via online media (WhatsApp is commonly used in the Caribbean) would be listed. Where would you put those messages?

2) I agree with your comment about aligning documentation to clauses of the standard. Very few people I know have actually read and understood ISO 9001:2015, clause 0.1 where it states "It is not the intent of this International Standard to imply the need for... alignment of documentation to the clause structure of this International Standard". Older Covers will remember organizations which used to have "Product Realization" procedures...
 

blackholequasar

The Cheerful Diabetic
1) I am interested in the triangle you posted, and at which level messages via online media (WhatsApp is commonly used in the Caribbean) would be listed. Where would you put those messages?

2) I agree with your comment about aligning documentation to clauses of the standard. Very few people I know have actually read and understood ISO 9001:2015, clause 0.1 where it states "It is not the intent of this International Standard to imply the need for... alignment of documentation to the clause structure of this International Standard". Older Covers will remember organizations which used to have "Product Realization" procedures...

So I thing using WhatsApp and other messaging applications would fall under "Records". That's where we store our emails here, so maybe the same would apply to information gathered through other applications. Though not all of our emails/messages apply as a record, only those with direct information (such as approvals for deviations, discussions involving design, etc) go into a record to be saved. We save them as records for our products (a product folder location) specifically. They are not 'controlled' like other documents, just records!
 

imkegg

Registered
Thanks for all of the help and info guys. I truly appreciate it.

Hopefully all of this information helps us get started in the right direction.

I'll be sure to post our progress as we move forward.
 

Funboi

On Holiday
My advice is to outline your QMS around ISO 9001, but do not directly align it. I work for a company that aligned their SOPs and Work Instructions 100% to each section of the 9001:2008 standard... and when the standard changed, as they do, all their numbering sequences changed. This is something I have honestly seen a lot of smaller companies do. So I would categorize it as a common pitfall!
This structure is so out of date! ISO doesnt even mention any of these types of documents!
 
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