Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo including content not in the forum - Search results with No ads.

Quality Case Analysis for MC550

S

Spence B

#11
With all respect to the students and professor, the paper, which I have now read 3 times, seems OK to me for MBA level students. The Holy Grail for many Quality practitioners is culture change, and training, benchmarking, incentives, etc., are all accepted approaches. It is self-evident that performance and culture are "sub-optimum" when compartmentalized upper management indulges in the "turf disputes" the students describe, as I read it. So far so good for analysis. My own experience is that a culture of effective problem solving gets us away from sub-optimalization. Some managers (like almost everybody) snipe a bit, but after forming-storming-norming-...you know. Whether we call it PDCA, PDSA, 5-P, 8-D, K-T, or whatever, objective evidence will show whether we have done the right thing. Are we gathering and understanding that evidence? Have we sought to implement good solutions wherever they might apply? Is the customer demanding to do repeat business? Honestly focusing on these questions reduces sniping, and then we may subjectively notice a culture change.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#12
Spence B said:
With all respect to the students and professor, the paper, which I have now read 3 times, seems OK to me for MBA level students. The Holy Grail for many Quality practitioners is culture change, and training, benchmarking, incentives, etc., are all accepted approaches. It is self-evident that performance and culture are "sub-optimum" when compartmentalized upper management indulges in the "turf disputes" the students describe, as I read it. So far so good for analysis. My own experience is that a culture of effective problem solving gets us away from sub-optimalization. Some managers (like almost everybody) snipe a bit, but after forming-storming-norming-...you know. Whether we call it PDCA, PDSA, 5-P, 8-D, K-T, or whatever, objective evidence will show whether we have done the right thing. Are we gathering and understanding that evidence? Have we sought to implement good solutions wherever they might apply? Is the customer demanding to do repeat business? Honestly focusing on these questions reduces sniping, and then we may subjectively notice a culture change.
I don't know whether we're straying off topic here or not, but I've seen far too many people at all levels of corporate hierarchies who tenaciously hold on to closely-held beliefs in spite of undeniable objective evidence that the beliefs are full of poop. What's missing in nearly all CI plans is plans for dealing with people (again, at all levels) whose personalities become significant obstacles to improvement.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#13
I do not know if anything has or is becoming of the paper at the company in question. We may not know until they (if they are able to) go to press with the "story of their success".

The paper I think could serve to open some eyes, and then I suspect the company would need to look more into the details of how to pull off improvements, and how to measure them, and how to determind success.

I will say this was the most interesting paper of those that came to me. One paper was simply a case study from past literature at a company no one in the group worked for. This was a nice paper in that it was "near and dear" to at least one of the students in the group.

By the way, I will be running the MC550 course next winter with another batch of students. I hope at least one of the papers will be as interesting as this one was.
 
Top Bottom