Quality Initiatives Die Out - What Can We Do to keep Them Going?

A

Andrews

We find that in a few cases the "Implementation drive" of any concept like 5S or VA/VE lasts only for a few days or months after which the team is not to be seen because they get drowned in their routine work.

What can be done to correct this situation?
 
N

noboxwine

Quick retort

Not much time for this post but trust I will be back later:

For starters, how about if we abolish the registration process & get back to fundamental quality. More acronyms and a hapless assessment system only drive up costs and reduce customer satisfaction. What CEO will back any program that is yielding a negative margin ? :D
 
A

Al Dyer

I guess I just have to ask:

Does the person/team in charge of the change have adequate authority?

Is the change being pushed my management?

Has the President of the company just read a new article and wants it implemented, without resources or proper delegation of duties?

The answers to the above could lead to reasons why other department team leaders fall back into the trap of late production and maintenance.

-Production Managers have to keep product flowing out the door.

-Maintenance Managers need to keep machines running while product goes out the door.

-Purchasing has to make sure that the both above have the tools to complete their tasks.

-Owners hold meeting to ask why the process is behind the time-lines they have set.

Just an opinion but the success of any plan, goal, or system is ultimately the responsibility of owners or top management. Many times they sit on high and pontificate orders that are unrealistically achievable because they do not know the true level of talent and how that talent is dispersed.

Don't blame the small guy, they are usually doing what they were told to do.

Succinctly, Management is to blame for 98% of the problems.

Al...:bigwave:
 

Kevin Mader

One of THE Original Covers!
Leader
Admin
Question: Is the intiative being 'driven' or is it 'pursued'? If it's being driven, once the person driving it gets tired, the effort collapses.

Regards,

Kevin
 

SteelMaiden

Super Moderator
Trusted Information Resource
Andrews said:
a few days or months after which the team is not to be seen because they get drowned in their routine work.

I think that the getting drowned in their reoutine work is often what happens. In my experience, top managment often appoints someone to be the driving force behind new initiatives, then does not give that person the authority (as stated earlier) to follow up. Then there is the resource problem. A person is supposed to take on a whole new project, yet none of their previous work is meted out to others. So, now you have a person with work heaped on them, no authority and little resources, and they are overwhelmed. The new initiative is no longer something that is exciting and shows promise of results; now it is just another chore in the long line of day-to-day workload. jmho
 

Mike S.

Happy to be Alive
Trusted Information Resource
As usual, Steel's points are right on target.

I've seen the new initiatives die under such a scenerio so often it sickens me.

When it is all boiled down, what the Top Dog wants done will get done. If the TD really and truly believes a certain program/effort/initiative is the best use of resources, and will pay big dividends, then he/she will make sure it gets done. However, too often they do not truly believe what they say, but they say it because they think they should. They expect a big return with little or no investment, and we all know how often that happens in any area of life. If the Top Dog is truly committed, it will get done, if not, it probably will not. There is no substitute for leadership. JMO.
 
T

Tom W

Simple yet true!

Could we just make all of these types of "Quality" initiatives actually mean something in the long run? Do we try to implement something along the lines of 5S because we employ slobs and can't get our act together. Many of these quality type projects are aimed at improvement, however we should want to improve before we implement or try to implement something.

Maybe I am looking at this to simply, but the initiative that succeeds and sticks around are the ones that get results, tangible results. Doing something that is not value added just to say we are doing it is a huge waste both financially and for morale.

JMHO but we should look to do what is good for business - value-added and effective. Not just look at the buzz words and projects. Lots of money is wasted on things that were destine to fail.

Too much thought goes into asking why did it fail and what was the leader doing and other questions. These are things that should have been thought about prior to implementing. What do we want to achieve? How are we going to get it? What road blocks do we face?

The 6P's (which I am still in search of) is a great place to start.

Proper Planning Prevents Pis$ Poor Performance! :whip:
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
Initiative?

Tom W said:
Could we just make all of these types of "Quality" initiatives actually mean something in the long run?
. . .
the initiative that succeeds and sticks around are the ones that get results, tangible results.
. . .
JMHO but we should look to do what is good for business - value-added and effective. Not just look at the buzz words and projects.
. . .
Too much thought goes into asking why did it fail and what was the leader doing and other questions. These are things that should have been thought about prior to implementing. What do we want to achieve? How are we going to get it? What road blocks do we face?
I think Tom W is on the right track. Very frequently, we, as organizations and as individuals, lose sight of the real definition of "initiative."

The U.S. Marine Corps had a working definition:
INITIATIVE
Definition: Initiative is taking action even though you haven't been given orders. It means meeting new and unexpected situations with prompt action. It includes using resourcefulness to get something done without the normal material or methods being available to you.
Suggestions for Improvement: To improve your initiative, work on staying mentally and physically alert. Be aware of things that need to be done and then to do them without having to be told.
If we translate that definition to Quality programs, we can get rid of the slogans and buzz words and concentrate on getting the job done.

Problem is: many organizations don't really know what needs to be done. Generations of workers and managers have worn blinders when it comes to identifying who the customer is. I wager that everyone reading this post can think of an organization where the overriding mandate for every employee is
"suck up to the boss"
NOT
"satisfy the customer's requirements"
 

SteelMaiden

Super Moderator
Trusted Information Resource
Good points Tom, yes there are a lot of fad programs and some companies just seem to jump ship because they think they need to follow the latest. But there are still those cases where even the most basic inititives are dropped due to lack of vision of the management. In a way I guess that becomes our problem as quality professionals because we either do not understand the program enough ourselves to be able to convince management, or we are just in the wrong company?

Of course, there are those places where the quality person is only a figurehead installed to maintain the piece of paper stating that the company is ISO certified, and those people really have it tough. They usually can see the usefullness, but cannot convince management at all.
 
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