Quality Management System vs. Effects of Local Culture on Implementing a QMS

F

fahadhmmad

#1
I am seeking answers of effects of local culture on implementing quality management system what are these effects ,how to overcome them are there any research on this topics
 
Elsmar Forum Sponsor
#2
I am seeking answers of effects of local culture on implementing quality management system what are these effects ,how to overcome them are there any research on this topics
Good subject. :agree1: For starters I suggest a look in the following threads, where similar (but not quite the same) subjects were discussed:

Changing Existing Quality Culture/Program - Where to Begin?
The Elusive Culture Change
Cultural influence and "lineage" of Quality Systems
Changing the Culture of an organisation where quality is a dirty word
Understanding Business Organizations - Organizational styles

As fahadhmmad indicates there are differences. The effort multinational companies need to put in to keep their branches in different cultures (not necessarily in different countries) makes that plain to see. In fact you can see vastly different cultures in two companies just across the street from each other...

How to adress them? First priority must be to know them, so let's have examples...

/Claes
 
M

mirrorcrax

#3
Mr. Fahad,

Excuse me, but i feel you're asking the wrong question, culture shouldn't influence the QMS as much as the QMS should influence culture.

Please let me elaborate:

The QMS isn't just a set of papers to be sent to your customers to boast your management's achievements and project a false picture of a hollow system, I believe that wouldn't and shouldn't be called a QMS in the first place! because its primary purpose (its real purpose) isn't related to quality and customer satisfaction, just related to personal gain or gratification.

The QMS is the final state of your business system after following specific requirements inspired by quality concepts layed out by professionals from all over the world.

SO...back to the point.... if culture (as in the antion's culture) influences the QMS negatively thus twisting the purpose of its existance then its no longer a QMS, just as when a car accident twists and bends a car thus mutilating it into becoming a WRECK!

If you're refering to the various obstacles that may face the implementation of a QMS due to cultural differences or the people's culture as it is: they're plenty in various forms and shapes, but if that culture is so damaging, then there wouldn't have been a business in the first place.

I get faced with cultural walls that affect implementation, especially when a company decides to deal customers from different cultures, with different standards and qualifications of personnel.

To my knowledge and belief i don't think that the culture of a country should twist the requirements of ISO9001:2000 in its implementation, but the solutions relating to applying it should naturally address the audience to whom it is intended.
 
#4
Excuse me, but i feel you're asking the wrong question, culture shouldn't influence the QMS as much as the QMS should influence culture.
Speaking of cultural differences, I will have to disagree with that (misunderstanding?). I definitely think culture should influence the QMS. Maybe the proper word should be different, and different does not necessarily mean bad. We should accept that those differences exist and adapt our systems to fit the needs of our respective organizations. The standard allows us to do that without affecting it's intent. It is just a question of achieving the same thing in different ways.

One size does not fit all.

but the solutions relating to applying it should naturally address the audience to whom it is intended.
Exactly :agree1: and I believe that was the essence of fahadhmmad's question (Was it?).

/Claes
 

Randy

Super Moderator
#5
Claes is correct as usual. ISO 9001 is generic so that it can be shaped to fit the needs of each organization (culture) while still having its requirements met.
 

Wes Bucey

Quite Involved in Discussions
#6
I often think about and counsel with companies struggling to implement new policies (business, quality, personnel, etc.) on an entrenched culture resistant to change.

Situations which trigger the crisis perceived by top management include, but are not limited to:
  1. mergers & acquisitions
  2. expansion or contraction of business
  3. opening new locations in different political or economic surroundings than orginal location
  4. pressure by customers in the marketplace to alter existng practices or lose business (child labor, safety issues, bias in gender or age, or race or religion, registration to international Standards, etc.)
Almost always, success in implementing the new policy depends on convincing the target population there is MORE BENEFIT in adopting the new policy than in maintaining status quo.

This means more effort on the part of the change manager and top managers than merely saying, "Because I said so!"

Some clues in being a successful change manager abound on the internet. Google "Change Management."
 
#7
Almost always, success in implementing the new policy depends on convincing the target population there is MORE BENEFIT in adopting the new policy than in maintaining status quo.

This means more effort on the part of the change manager and top managers than merely saying, "Because I said so!"
Yes, there it is...:agree1: The basic question is: "What is in it for me? A manager failing to provide a satisfactory answer is in for a hard time, and if there is no satisfactory answer... then it's time to seriously rethink the concept.

/Claes
 

Wes Bucey

Quite Involved in Discussions
#8
Yes, there it is...:agree1: The basic question is: "What is in it for me? A manager failing to provide a satisfactory answer is in for a hard time, and if there is no satisfactory answer... then it's time to seriously rethink the concept.

/Claes
Further rumination on "change management:"
Frequently, autocratic owners and managers operate with FEAR as the prime motivation. In the short term, this may seem to accomplish the change in record time, but history has shown that populations ruled by fear invariably are less innovative and "work to the book" while subtly sabotaging production. Sometimes there is a revolt, but most often, the best workers merely leave for other employment with a better work atmosphere and the production rate falls with the remaining timid workers, increasing training costs for new hires who do not have the benefit of on-the-job trainng from the best workers.

The change manager faced with such a situation [of FEAR imposed by owners and top managers] must find a way to educate the fear mongers of the self-defeating result of using fear to control a work population.
 

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Staff member
Admin
#9
Yes, there it is...:agree1: The basic question is: "What is in it for me? A manager failing to provide a satisfactory answer is in for a hard time, and if there is no satisfactory answer... then it's time to seriously rethink the concept.

/Claes
Claes, this is the perspective from the developed world. In the developing world (being PC), a significant percentage of the workforce is illiterate and expected NOT to think when working in their assembly lines. I have audited many organizations in Latin America where work instructions had to be visual aids only, such as pictures or sketches, because, as mentioned before, workers are not able to read textual instructions. In maquiladoras, when you have a workforce turnover rate of 30% or higher, managers tend not to care much about what the workers think. In organizations such as this, the ISO 9000 principle of "people involvement" is totally ignored. On the other hand, employee adherence to instructions is done religiously. Because the employees know that, if they screw up, they will not have a second chance.

I do believe that the OP was referring to "cultural differences" along these lines. The absolute "command and control" approach, predominantly used in developing economies, has a military discipline expectation. Don't deviate from the process, don't ask questions, don't worry about improving anything, and most importantly, don't think.
 

Wes Bucey

Quite Involved in Discussions
#10
Claes, this is the perspective from the developed world. In the developing world (being PC), a significant percentage of the workforce is illiterate and expected NOT to think when working in their assembly lines. I have audited many organizations in Latin America where work instructions had to be visual aids only, such as pictures or sketches, because, as mentioned before, workers are not able to read textual instructions. In maquiladoras, when you have a workforce turnover rate of 30% or higher, managers tend not to care much about what the workers think. In organizations such as this, the ISO 9000 principle of "people involvement" is totally ignored. On the other hand, employee adherence to instructions is done religiously. Because the employees know that, if they screw up, they will not have a second chance.

I do believe that the OP was referring to "cultural differences" along these lines. The absolute "command and control" approach, predominantly used in developing economies, has a military discipline expectation. Don't deviate from the process, don't ask questions, don't worry about improving anything, and most importantly, don't think.
I agree that may have been "part" of the O.P. The true change manager (as Deming often said) has to show how a short-sighted policy like that is counter-productive over the long run. As I never tire of repeating, Deming's Red Beads consistently shows "blind obedience to a plan" does not necessarily result in consistent production. Where is it written an organization cannot engage in "developing" its work force? Many tyrannical employers want to keep employees ignorant so they may be exploited. Do we, as Quality professionals, want to go on record as saying that's OK?
 
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