Quality Manager Training Methods - Learning and Implementing ISO 9001

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
Re: LRQA Recommendation

I studied 2 courses in LRQA – Internal Auditor and Lead Auditor. These courses are approved by IRCA.
For me these courses were very useful. I recommended LRQA to help, not for advertising.
Probably there are many good training organizations but in I know more about LRQA.
Thanks for letting us know. Now people reading this thread will know why you recommend LRQA. We appreciate people recommending a company, products or services based upon their experience with them.
 
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RussG1961

Re: Quality Manager Training Methods

I would not put it on a time line which I was going to give to a customer.
Great, i was thinking the same. Feels good to know i am on the right track. Cheers
 

Colin

Quite Involved in Discussions
Re: Quality Manager Training Methods

Thanks for the speedy input all.

colpart:

I was wondering what your opinion might be as regarding question number 2?

2. Would you include such training in the project timeline? If yes, How would you label the "task assigned to" row, if said training is the "study" of the "ISO 9001:2008 Quality management systems-Requirements." Booklet ?

I fully plan to attend some or all of the training you and others might recommend.

However, the main task i have to complete this week is this "ISO Certification Project timeline" which was requested by a customer. (Sales and CEO is pushing me! )

We have met with the customers internal ISO Rep who is very knowledgeable in all things ISO and several industry management standards.

He stated that it was in his best interest to work with us on our endeavor to get ISO Registered and said he wouldn't "hold us hard and fast to a date".

He did however ask for a "road map" to ISO Certification so he could report to his company in good confidence that we are serious about ISO and have a plan to to get there.

So would you include such training as part of the "timeline" or just let said customer assume that your company has taken the necessary steps to see to it that all involved in the project are competent.

Thanks RussG

Russ, I use a very simple project plan to explain to new clients how the project is likely to pan out. I have attached an example which was for a small client who wanted certification really quickly.

I suspect that the customer knows that many companies set off down this route with good intentions but never actually get there, or at least, it takes a long time so that is why he wants the timeline. Feel free to use the example if it helps.
 

Attachments

  • ISO 9001 Plan.xlsx
    10.7 KB · Views: 417
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RussG1961

Re: Quality Manager Training Methods

Russ, I use a very simple project plan to explain to new clients how the project is likely to pan out. I have attached an example which was for a small client who wanted certification really quickly.

I suspect that the customer knows that many companies set off down this route with good intentions but never actually get there, or at least, it takes a long time so that is why he wants the timeline. Feel free to use the example if it helps.
Colin. Thanks for the link to the file.

Is there any chance you could send it in "xls" only and not xlsx?

I cant seem to open it in Office 2000. Thanks

RussG
 

Colin

Quite Involved in Discussions
Sorry Russ, I never thought about the version.
 

Attachments

  • ISO 9001 Plan.xls
    20 KB · Views: 457

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
FWIW:
I wouldn't limit training to just ISO 9001.

I think a great outline for the overall duties ANY quality manager should have a grasp of (not necessarily COMPLETE MASTERY) is the BOK for
Manager of Quality/Organizational Excellence Body of Knowledge. I do not mean one has to take the ASQ training or go for the certification, but the person holding the job should have some knowledge of each of the items listed in the BOK.

The fact your shop is small is another reason (in MY view) you don't need to jump into formal training, yet (perhaps some time in the future.)

The important part of being a QM in a small shop is having a grasp of the big picture. If you are not a statistics maven, you can hire some one who is from your local ASQ to come out and help set up SPC for your shop and be on call when you have questions or problems.

In my view, you shouldn't bog yourself down learning all the stuff a QM at a 1,000 person shop knows, but start small for the situation at hand today.
Complete noob here.

I have recently been delegated as our companies Quality Systems Manager.

I am currently developing an "ISO Certification Project Timeline" chart that was requested by a potential customer. ( profitable account ).

We have met with an consultant and have elected to do much of the work ourselves (me) In the Creation of our QMS, Policy and implementation thereof.

We are a small steel grinding shop. 2 machine operators, President, Salesman, Shop Foreman, Every other Hat guy (me). Thats 10 total. :D

The question i have is regarding the "training" of the Quality Manager (me).

1. Would you recommend a "training kit"or simply take the time to study and get a grasp on the ISO 9001:2008 Standard? ( which i am confident i can do )

2. Would you include such training in the project timeline? If yes, How would you label the "task assigned to" row, if said training is the study of the "ISO 9001:2008 Quality management systems-Requirements." Booklet ?

Thanks in advance

Russ G.
 
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RussG1961

Well, I wasn't in the dinosaur software age you wouldn't have had to worry about it.

Thanks so much for the xls file.
 
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RussG1961

Wes.

Thanks for your input as well.

I plan to "own" this project and title and will likely go way beyond the training that is needed for this company.

But I always tend to work on the premise of "You can take my job, but not my knowledge".

Who knows, i might be looking at a career change sooner than i thought. ;)

I do appreciate the advise and will consider every point made.

Thanks again.
 
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keres

Re: Quality Manager Training Methods

By my opinion the duration of the tasks in this plan is to short. For example 1.5 days to developing a quality manual is not enough.
 

Colin

Quite Involved in Discussions
Re: Quality Manager Training Methods

By my opinion the duration of the tasks in this plan is to short. For example 1.5 days to developing a quality manual is not enough.

Don't forget, developing manuals ans procedures is our (consultants) business and like other jobs, you get used to doing things more quickly when you need to. I would love to charge more days for developing the manual but the client doesn't usually want to pay for it!

In the example shown, it was a small (7 employees), office based organisation with very few processes and no design, no calibration, etc. I do agree that the timescales were tight but that was down to the customer's needs. By the way, they passed without an N/C or observation just over a week ago.
 
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