Quality Objectives. What? How? And How important to the organization?

S

s_warin

Qaulity Objectives. What? How? And How important to the organization?

Please give us your opinion.

And what is the relationship of quality objectives and goals, and key performance indicators (KPI)?
 
I fully agree with Jims opinion about the two categories (Strange... I wonder if I'm coming down with something;) ).

All right, S_warin... Here is an opinion:

Any half decent athlete knows the importance of setting goals, objectives, or whatever. For that reason I find it extemely hard to grasp the fact that so many management groups treat the idea like a dead racoon...:confused:

/Claes
 

SteelMaiden

Super Moderator
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Claes Gefvenberg said:

Any half decent athlete knows the importance of setting goals, objectives, or whatever. For that reason I find it extemely hard to grasp the fact that so many management groups treat the idea like a dead racoon...:confused:

/Claes

Ah, Claes, you just made my day! I have never been able to figure out why there is such a resistance to letting your goals be known. We all know that there are goals, we listen to managers speak around them at all the staff/employee meetings, right? Nobody wants to come right out and quantify them, though. My opinion is that management type people are taught some class in university that tells them that if they actually speak the goal out load it will not happen. Kind of like telling the 2 year old that they can't tell anyone their birthday wish or it won't come true?

I love your comparison to an athlete, it is absolutely true. In athletics you are trained to relax and focus on that visual video in your mind, seeing exactly what it will take to make you the winner of the competition. I don't know about your management, but some of ours were actually college athletes, they should have the ability to do this. So why is it that one year later, I'm still fighting to get two depts to commit?

I truly feel, at least in our case, that there is a very real fear of failure. Managers do not seem to realize that a goal is a GOAL, not a contract, not a felony in the making. People hate to fail, and if you don't set goals that make you stretch and grow, you don't have to worry about failing.

I tell management to make the goal realistic, but tough enough that it presents a challange. They look at me like I'm crazy. "Why would we want to take the chance of not meeting our goal?" they ask. My answer is that any body can set a goal that you are going to meet anyway, so why not reach for the stars? You might fail to meet the goal 100%, but if you get to 95, 97 or 99% aren't you a lot further ahead than if you would have set the goal at 75% of your potential? But still they focus on the fact that we did not "reach" the goal, therefroe we failed.

Remember, the standard says continuous/continual improvement not continually attaining goals.

OK, I'm stepping down, somebody else can use the soapbox now. Thanks for letting me vent!:frust:
 

Mike S.

Happy to be Alive
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SteelMaiden said:

Ah, Claes, you just made my day! I have never been able to figure out why there is such a resistance to letting your goals be known.
I agree with Steel and Claes about goal setting generally being a good thing and that one's goal(s) should be a bit of a challenge. However, I think I can give some insight as to why SOME Managers fear setting goals, especially challengine ones: Answer: Their Boss or The "Big" Boss

I have been in organizations with less than ideal cultures where the Boss asked everyone to set challenging goals. The Boss and the underlings reviewed the goals, made sure they were aligned with corporate goals, SMART, and agreed upon by all parties, etc. Everything sounded great. But, in several cases, the promised support (time, personnel, or money) that the goal-setter needed was actually never provided as originally agreed, but the goal-setters were still held to their goals at the end of the agreed-upon period. "You have to adapt, overcome, make things happen" they were told, and when their goals were only partly met, they were "punished" by poor reviews. I guess what I'm saying is that SOMETIMES the reason for resistance to goal setting might be a learned behavior analogous to not wanting to touch a hot stove twice. I'd look at that as a possibility and if it doesn't look valid, then look elsewhere. JMO
 
S

s_warin

Are they the same?

Are the goal, the indicator, the quality objective the same?
Give us some perspectives!
And the meaning of purpose?

The sequence in MBNQA is; (?)
Purpose,
Vision,
Objective,
Goal.

:biglaugh:
 
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