Quality System Induction Training for New Employees

Skilz

Starting to get Involved
#1
Hi All,

Im looking at improving our current "9001/14001 Induction Training" for new employees. The current induction thats being done is very dull and need to be spiced up a bit, to make it more attractive to the new employee.

Does anybody have a template or even slide show i can use to adapt my system to?

Thank you all for this great forum, I always get great reads
 

Jean_B

Involved In Discussions
#2
If it's the interest and engagement level that's waning then a template or pre-fab isn't going to fix it.
Engagement is determined more by interactions and delivery than by how attractive something looks.
Interest is linked to motivation, be it extrensic (make this or miss out (on money, promotion, a job)) or intrinsic (partially influenced by engagement but more up to the culture of the workforce and the character and experiences of a person).
If there's confusion then the structure of a template or someone else's might help as inspiration, but it isn't a replacement for making and knowing your own presentation by heart (hint: if you need more than a glance at the slides now and then you don't know it well enough).

For engagement the biggest effect our company (medical device) achieves is done with equipment to simulate the condition of our patient. This is timed to coincide with the point in the induction where we mention what our core objective is, and how hard our personal and working life would be if we would suffer from these conditions. This hits home quite well, on the awareness of the end result we're going for. (It doesn't garantuee attention on all of those baby-steps in doing and supporting production, R&D and customer service matters).
Interest is too personal to make comments about without knowing the people and the company. It is recommended to talk with each of the attendees on a personal or inclusive group base before the presentation, and some research suggests having looked each other in the eyes before training increases effectiveness.
Structure-wise, think of breaking stuff up, even if it's just by switching away from a particular topic to come back to it later. Long stretches without breaks are terrible for interest, attention and learning capacity. Also switch the people presenting in a team manner, instead of one-out, other-in; this shows how well you work together (if you pull it of). Have duo's present and support or take over from each other on the long stretches if you must have those, because there are only very few people that keep interest going before their voice, mannerisms and looks becomes their focus instead of what they're saying.
For making stuff attractive, Presentation Zen was always a nice and clear book.
 

Skilz

Starting to get Involved
#3
If it's the interest and engagement level that's waning then a template or pre-fab isn't going to fix it.
Engagement is determined more by interactions and delivery than by how attractive something looks.
Interest is linked to motivation, be it extrensic (make this or miss out (on money, promotion, a job)) or intrinsic (partially influenced by engagement but more up to the culture of the workforce and the character and experiences of a person).
If there's confusion then the structure of a template or someone else's might help as inspiration, but it isn't a replacement for making and knowing your own presentation by heart (hint: if you need more than a glance at the slides now and then you don't know it well enough).

For engagement the biggest effect our company (medical device) achieves is done with equipment to simulate the condition of our patient. This is timed to coincide with the point in the induction where we mention what our core objective is, and how hard our personal and working life would be if we would suffer from these conditions. This hits home quite well, on the awareness of the end result we're going for. (It doesn't garantuee attention on all of those baby-steps in doing and supporting production, R&D and customer service matters).
Interest is too personal to make comments about without knowing the people and the company. It is recommended to talk with each of the attendees on a personal or inclusive group base before the presentation, and some research suggests having looked each other in the eyes before training increases effectiveness.
Structure-wise, think of breaking stuff up, even if it's just by switching away from a particular topic to come back to it later. Long stretches without breaks are terrible for interest, attention and learning capacity. Also switch the people presenting in a team manner, instead of one-out, other-in; this shows how well you work together (if you pull it of). Have duo's present and support or take over from each other on the long stretches if you must have those, because there are only very few people that keep interest going before their voice, mannerisms and looks becomes their focus instead of what they're saying.
For making stuff attractive, Presentation Zen was always a nice and clear book.
Thanks for your input Jean
 

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