R-E-S-P-E-C-T - Suggestions on how this can be achieved in a quality program?

Is Training the answer to getting RESPECT?

  • Yes - I think so

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    10
M

mac@home

Any suggestions on how this can be achieved in a quality program with a historically quick cycle time for managers, engineers, upper level quality personnel, (not inspectors).
How can people be convinced that quality initiatives are not just "flavour of the week" or a passing fad? Does training everyone on these programs help appreciably? I was with a company, not in a quality role, and when we had training on "lean manufacturing" I don't recall overwhelming support arising from the classes.
Results of quality programs can be hard to justify to the manufacturing floor, which operates on a case-to-case basis, not a systems viewpoint. Are there programs for systems training for manufacturing personnel? (I checked the Cayman Systems offerings and found ISO for hourly employees, but not systems viewpoint for them. Did I miss something?)
Thanks,
 

barb butrym

Quite Involved in Discussions
Training ...done properly, is the key to getting people on board.

You have to hit home, as in.....each naysayer has a hot point, if you can take the loudest protestor and convert him by showing him what "it" will do to make his life better....he will convert the rest. And you can merrily go along getting the "border line" believers on board, spreading your message.

Training needs to be developed with the client, what you call systems viewpoint, is probably his hourly stuff. I am sure he has something to fill the bill, its basic actually...not nearly as "special" as you indicate...you would be surprised at the commonality in the manufacturing world, no matter what the industry....its mainly semantics
 

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
barb butrym said:
Training ...done properly, is the key to getting people on board.
What do YOU think? Is Training the answer to getting 'RESPECT'?

If not, what is?
 
T

Tanahy

Not With All

Well, I think that training is the way... actually IT IS the way but I wont poll with first answer becasue not all people will yeild with training...I swear I can fill the forum with my daily stories about people and thier behaviors ... and guys guess what? I am dealing with the TWO COMPANIES... one that had system already (9001:94) and one that HAD NOTHING AND NEVER HAD EVEN A QA engineer or whatever ... Training is working with SOME people and some are ................
its the issue of my life now!
 
C

Charmed

Tanahy on Training

Dear Tanahy:

Nice to see you responding to this thread. I notice that you are only 24 years old and a new Cover. I am also new to the Cove, much older though.

Anyway, as far as R-E-S-P-E-C-T is concerned, I don't think it has anything to do with training, advanced degrees, certification, or anything of that sort that you can hang on your wall. It has much more to do with what you have inside you that no one can see but which comes out every time you walk, every time you talk, and every time you deal with people.

Treat everyone with respect and consideration, and you will get R-E-S-P-E-C-T. We understand this in our personal life, but seem to fail to understand this in our work lives. I come across a lot of people driving like crazy and literally trying to drive me off the road some days. I don't understand where they are going - in such a hurry. At work, I often see many people, not acting, or doing anything. They seem to refuse to make decisions and actually being roadblocks! On the road, however, it is all a big big hurry and a great madness.

Then I tell myself, I am sure, this person will not do, or behave in this rude and aggressive manner, if we were to meet in person. So, I just let it go.

I will admit though that, when I was younger, I have done a thing or two that were very stupid! Anyway, R-E-S-P-E-C-T is earned in a very different sort of way, not by training. That was my point. With my warm regards and great success to you in life.

Charmed :) :thanx:
 

RoxaneB

Change Agent and Data Storyteller
Super Moderator
I was reading the thread topic to be more in line with obtaining "respect" for the quality management system, not individual respect and so my response is in regards to that.

Getting past the 'flavour of the week' tag that may be applied to the management system is difficult...especially if your organization has a lengthy history of implementing (but not maintain) fads and business concepts.

Some ideas for considersation are...

  • You're not implementing ISO 9001...you're simply formalizing your processes (that way, should Customers start asking for ISO registration, you're in good shape to get it...but you don't need to use the buzz word "ISO" in your discussions).
  • Communication...be it training, signs, newsletters, banners flown from a passing airplane. Communication is, however, only effective if you are speaking a language people understand. If the education level is low, use common words. If it's sales, talk $ and Customers. If it's management, talk $, time, ROI, Customers, efficiency, and improvement.
  • Commitment from Managment and you! They have to want this...you have to want this. You have just become the QMS Cheerleaders. Get excited! Believe! It's Game 7 of the series championship...tied at 3 games apiece...you don't get this done, you lose! If you don't believe, how do you expect to get others to?
  • Know the benefits and share them! Tell people how this will help make their jobs easier. Show them proof!
  • Get involvement from others. If you are responsible for getting registration, get other people from other departments involved. Once they get excited, they'll pass it on to their coworkers, too.

Training is all well and good, but it is not the only way to obtaining buy-in for a managment system.
 
R

Rob Nix

There is no direct correlation between training and respect. If that were so, then all PHDs should be given more respect than any high school graduate. Yet, many with doctorates garner little respect, and some people with little education are highly respected.

The definition of respect is the giving of particular attention or deference to one judged worthy of esteem; a recognition and due regard for another person, his qualities, achievements, office, position, or authority.

Respect is something others give you. You cannot get it yourself; through training or by any other means. Some people try to demand respect, but they do not get it if others do not believe it is deserving.

Now, if you get training because you intend to use it to benefit your company or other people, and the application of that training yields the respect of others, then there is a connection. However, trying to make an all encompassing correlation between the two is impossible.
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
Rob Nix said:
There is no direct correlation between training and respect. If that were so, then all PHDs should be given more respect than any high school graduate. Yet, many with doctorates garner little respect, and some people with little education are highly respected.

The definition of respect is the giving of particular attention or deference to one judged worthy of esteem; a recognition and due regard for another person, his qualities, achievements, office, position, or authority.

Respect is something others give you. You cannot get it yourself; through training or by any other means. Some people try to demand respect, but they do not get it if others do not believe it is deserving.

Now, if you get training because you intend to use it to benefit your company or other people, and the application of that training yields the respect of others, then there is a connection. However, trying to make an all encompassing correlation between the two is impossible.
In short, you have to EARN respect. That means, in most cases, you have to give respect before you can receive respect. I'm sure you can recall "hating" someone who always thought he was better than you because he looked better, had more money, etc., but that you probably have friends and colleagues who also look better, have more money, etc. than you, but you respect them because they respect you.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Leader
Super Moderator
Training is only a piece of the RESPECT puzzle. Granted, without training it is unlikely to happen, but training alone is not sufficient to get RESPECT. It all depends on how the new applications provided by the training are USED.
 
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