Re: Training for ISO 9K2K

W

Wicker Basket

More courses than you can shake a stick at

It could be a while before I get to brief by boss on the things suggested here. He's decided to extend his business trip to Germany for three more weeks.

As for Courses for top management, I've been doing research on the various courses available, and I didn't realise there were so many. The basics are we probably have enough budget to send management on either an ISO 9000 introduction course OR an ISO 9000 internal auditing course, however most of the auditing courses state that prior knowledge of ISO 9000 is a requirement. Should I go for the introduction course, so they know what they're supposed to be doing, or do I try and get them to understand ISO 9000 and then send them on the auditing course?

We can't really afford more than a 1-2 day course, and we're in the UK so as much as I'd like your service (db, howste :) ) were stuck with the local selection

The Basket
 

howste

Thaumaturge
Trusted Information Resource
Randy Stewart said:
I'm okay now, but thanks for the wake-up :vfunny:
LOL, you're welcome. :D

Wicker, my choice would probably still be the internal auditor class. I think most classes recommend prior knowledge of ISO 9001, but don't require it. I often have people in auditor classes I teach that don't even know how to spell ISO, much less know what the standard requires. One of the first things we do is cover the entire standard. The auditor classes have the added value of exersizes to apply the information learned, as well as seeing things from the auditor's standpoint & what they (management) will need to do to be prepared.
 
W

Wicker Basket

howste said:
Wicker, my choice would probably still be the internal auditor class. I think most classes recommend prior knowledge of ISO 9001, but don't require it. I often have people in auditor classes I teach that don't even know how to spell ISO, much less know what the standard requires. One of the first things we do is cover the entire standard. The auditor classes have the added value of exersizes to apply the information learned, as well as seeing things from the auditor's standpoint & what they (management) will need to do to be prepared.

Cheers Howste, I'll break out the whiteboard and explain as much about ISO 9K2K as I can before pack them off to the best/most economical/nearest/most expensive(?) auditing course I can find.

Anyway I'm off to enjoy the bank holiday weekend. :bigwave:
 
R

Rick Goodson

Hi Wicker,

Welcome to the Cove.

Just a thought. In some cases it is more economical to have a consultant do an onsite, rather than packing off to a public program. One advantage of the consultant approach is during the course delivery ithey can address your specific questions/needs. As I said, just a thought.

Rick
 

RoxaneB

Change Agent and Data Storyteller
Super Moderator
Rick Goodson said:
Hi Wicker,

Welcome to the Cove.

Just a thought. In some cases it is more economical to have a consultant do an onsite, rather than packing off to a public program. One advantage of the consultant approach is during the course delivery ithey can address your specific questions/needs. As I said, just a thought.

Rick

While I agree with that approach, Rick, only potential problem is the door that separates the meeting room from the office. To often people disappear "for just a minute" and return 30 minutes later. That's not fair to any of the parties participating in the course.

I do like having a consultant do the training because, if they're good, they'll come onsite first to learn the processes and maybe even tailor the course a bit towards the industry...easier to learn if you understand the examples and can relate to the exercises, right?

So, how about a consultant doing the course but off-site?
 
D

db

RCBeyette said:
While I agree with that approach, Rick, only potential problem is the door that separates the meeting room from the office. To often people disappear "for just a minute" and return 30 minutes later. That's not fair to any of the parties participating in the course.

I do like having a consultant do the training because, if they're good, they'll come onsite first to learn the processes and maybe even tailor the course a bit towards the industry...easier to learn if you understand the examples and can relate to the exercises, right?

So, how about a consultant doing the course but off-site?

You point out a major problem with on-site training. I did an on-site internal auditor class, with 20 participants for a company once and at no time did I have more than 15 in the class. Seven missed the last two hours, including the final exam.

We quite often do training for companies at our location, or at some other off-site location. An alternate would be, as one company I often train at is to consider everyone off site. They are not allowed to answer pages, or leave the room on breaks. They must be back from breaks at the required time. The Prez often sits in on the classes as well.
 
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