Risk Assessment & Contingency Planning (API Q1, 9th. Ed.)

M

MalDu

Guest
#1
Referring to the new requirements of the 9th. Edition of API Spec Q1 for risk assessment & management & contingency planning, I've made a standard (general) Risk Assessment and Management Sheet and a Standard Contingency Plan and specified in procedure that specific ones are generated when needed. i.e. when the requirements differ (e.g. new order that we haven't done before).

In other words, we don't have to do risk assessment and contingency planning for every single order I mean. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Thanks.
 

bluepagen

Inactive Registered Visitor
#3
MalDu, we made a simple Risk Register, something that was divided by processes, jotting down things that have caused issues in the past for each process and things that can go wrong in each process.
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#5
Referring to the new requirements of the 9th. Edition of API Spec Q1 for risk assessment & management & contingency planning, I've made a standard (general) Risk Assessment and Management Sheet and a Standard Contingency Plan and specified in procedure that specific ones are generated when needed. i.e. when the requirements differ (e.g. new order that we haven't done before).

In other words, we don't have to do risk assessment and contingency planning for every single order I mean. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Thanks.
While I am not familiar with this particular standard, in my experience when 'contingency planning' is involved, this is more inline with developing and implementing processes and practices should there be a disaster or emergency which impacts your facility. These could include computer systems/backups, energy shut-downs and start-ups, natural disasters, terrorism, etc. The purpose is two-fold:

  1. To ensure the company resumes operating in a safe and effective and timely manner.
  2. To demonstrate that processes are in place ensuring all possible actions will be taken to meet customer requirements (e.g., product specifications, delivery dates, etc.)

I didn't think this particular subject addressed making a new order (i.e., one with specifications that has not be manufactured previously)...wouldn't that fall under product planning/design?

Again, I am not familiar with the details of this particular standard and if I am wrong, I'm sure I'll be corrected. :cool:
 
B

BGirard

Guest
#7
Thanks bluepagan... that was very helpful... so once this register is made, when is it consulted? every order... were a service company trying to make it in a manufacturing spec...lol

BG
 

bluepagen

Inactive Registered Visitor
#8
That is a very good question, and one that our Quality Manager just asked me yesterday. He wanted to kow what was the evidence of the review of the risk register.

In our company, we use the risk register right up front, in requests for quotes, reviewing an order and entering an order. Then bringing all together again to go through all the details of a job. Sales can see what has happened in the past, what can happen, and how we have mitigated it to reduce the risk. We went as far as to document a question on our contract review form and supplemental contract review form asking if the risk register has been reviewed. This requires the sales person to do a quick check, in his areas listed on the register, and sign. This form and the supplemental contract review form both have the question, and once filled out during the reviews, it is put into the sales file, or scanned in for the electronic file.

Evidence of the review of the risk register is the person's name on the checklists, which also gets dated.

One of the new questions when doing internal audits, is at what point in your job is the risk register reviewed? Followed with- and how are you indicating the review? A simple print out of that departments review of risks associated with their area of responsibilities, can be printed, signed, dated and forwarded to sales for inclusion into the file.

Our engineering department does FEMA and FEMDA's on their end, so that is associated to the design file.

It is a new process for us also. We really did not know how to approach it either. As an auditor, I have a finding history that I have kept for 10+ years. I always review back to that file when something is noted in an audit that I know is a blast from the past. A lot of times something will occur again when we beef up our staff with new people or when we are swamped! So people tend to try to hurry, skip a step, fail to question, or whatever we as people tend to do. That history, to me, meant is was possible to do it because we at some point did it, but, we had a corrective actioin for it, and that was where I started. These things did happen and could happen again. Luckily we had a way to midigate the risk, and that was by looking at the documentation that was provided when it was and opportunity for improvement or a finding.
 
B

BGirard

Guest
#9
bluepagen... thanks for the insight, I seen in your profile that we work for the same company under the same group, I could really use some help bouncing some stuff. If you would be interested hit me up on the company email

Brian Girard
 

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