Seeking Corrective Action Examples, Case studies - For Class

R

Russ

I am in need of some corrective action examples, case studies if you will, that could be worked out in a class I have put together to help inform our Supervisors etc. how to put together an effective corrective action and action plan to eliminate a nonconformance. I believe adding this to our in-house training program would be a boost to just going over the material. Short scenarios would suffice, giving them something ti investigate in class. Any ideas all?

:bigwave:
 

Mike S.

Happy to be Alive
Trusted Information Resource
Russ,

My gut feeling is your people would learn more, and perhaps identify better with, examples from your own company. Wouldn't they?
 
R

Russ

Mike S.,
We are doing that by looking over a selection of ones that are not investigated yet & some that are not validated. I am just looking for the widest choices I can find. Thanks for the reply.
 

barb butrym

Quite Involved in Discussions
just my opinion

I'd stay away from work examples if its a new topic......
bring it home with real life everyone can relate to.

leaky shower head

car won't start when its damp/cold

pizza sticks to the top of the box

mud in the house after a rain storm

coffee too strong, or weak or inconsistent.

start with a problem (like one of the above) talk about root causes, the short term fix and the long term fix so it doesn't happen again...bring in continuous improvement too...get creative and use fishbones and other tools if time permits.
 
K

kspurling

I use an Access Database showing the audit element, procedure and revision and then I have an area for the description of the problem. A macro sends an email notification to the affected manager and then he goes in the database and fills out the Root cause, corrective action, whether or not there was a need for a procedure change, The date completed and effective. Then I go in and OK the corrective action and then our auditors verfify the effectiveness and close the finding.
 
C

Chris May

Russ,

I agree with Barb on this one.

Depending upon your audience, hopefully you know them well enough to identify some common interests that are not work related, maybe fishing, football, etc;

You will find that because it is not "work related", people will be more forthcoming with discussions.

Then as Mike mentioned, swing it around to a work related problem and have them expend there new found enthusiasm on that.

Regards,

Chris
 
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