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Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership: Hamlet

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#11
ccochran said:
Roxane,

Those are some great questions. I think I consider Hamlet to be a little like Jimmy Carter: a very smart guy who has deep thoughts and good intentions, but not an effective leader on the level he must perform at. Your mention of Lady Macbeth caused an epiphany: she's a great example of a leader (albeit a tad bit evil). I've already written an article on Mr. Macbeth, but a large part of it is consumed with the exploits of Lady Macbeth. She's a natural! Maybe not someone you would trust your kids with, but an interesting demonstration of a number of strong attributes. Sharpen your knives...
We studied Macbeth in Grade 10 English. For my project...I did a psycho-analysis of Lady MacBeth, explaining her "state of mind", and even played in her my taped report...a taped session with Lady Macbeth. Later that semester, I got to play Catherine the Great in English class....what a riot!
 

ccochran

Southern Gentleman
#12
Lady Macbeth, caught on tape

Roxane,

I don't know why Macbeth is always the first Shakespeare people are exposed to in high school. It's bleak, cynical, and very violent. Hey, perfect for the high schoolers! I bet you were a kick b*tt Lady Macbeth. Do you still have the tape of you playing her? You need to digitize it and post it here.

Craig
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#13
ccochran said:
Roxane,

I don't know why Macbeth is always the first Shakespeare people are exposed to in high school. It's bleak, cynical, and very violent. Hey, perfect for the high schoolers! I bet you were a kick b*tt Lady Macbeth. Do you still have the tape of you playing her? You need to digitize it and post it here.

Craig
Hah! You couldn't pay me enough to do that! :eek: Actually, for us, the first Shakespearean play to study was "The Merchant of Venice"...another strong round of female characters. Now that I think about it, though, our English teacher in Grade 9 and Grade 10 was a bit of an extreme feminist...
 

ccochran

Southern Gentleman
#15
He longs to eat the English (Henry V, 3.7.95)

Greg,

Great idea! I'm reading Henry V right now, in fact. I just finished the scene where the French noblemen (Dauphin, Constable, Orleans) are bragging about how they're going to kick some English tail. Little do they know what is waiting for them. I rented the Kenneth Branagh movie version a couple of weeks ago, but my wife punked out on me. Everybody has to be equally enthusiastic about a Shakespeare movie in order for it to be enjoyable. That was the night she asked me to rent a Jackie Chan movie, but I came home with Henry V instead. Boy did I screw up!

Roxane,

I'm willing to resort to bribery in order to hear Lady Macbeth in action. How much would it take? I understand I'm negotiating with the big leagues now...

Craig
 
#16
There have been frequent times in my corporate life when I replayed the Thane of Caldor's encounter with the phantom dagger in Act II when he begins his soliloquy

Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
A dagger of the mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?

It was as I was fantasizing about cutting some fellow executive off at the knees for being an obstructionist in MY plans. It was at those moments I truly understood Macbeth's obsession and realized I didn't want to go down THAT path. So, I let the guy live another day.:rolleyes:

And so, unlike McBeth, I KEPT my head!
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#17
ccochran said:
I'm willing to resort to bribery in order to hear Lady Macbeth in action. How much would it take? I understand I'm negotiating with the big leagues now...
Craig, Craig, Craig... :nope:

We are like the NHL talks on this issue...so far apart, we might as well conduct negotiations in separate rooms and pass notes back and forth (just like they did). That Lady Macbeth tape will be kept locked away from prying hands, eyes and ears...especially for any hatchlings I should ever have. I remember the razzing I gave my Mom when I saw her report cards from when she was young lady...the last thing I need is for my own offspring to get their grubby paws on this tape. Of course...I should destroy it...but I just can't bring myself to "Erase! Erase darn tape!" (to paraphrase the great Lady herself).
 
W

wolfnature

#18
RCBeyette said:
We are like the NHL talks on this issue...
You just had to bring up the NHL. I'm trying to get over that tragedy :mad: :(

Although I'll bet if The Great One were to ask for that tape you might give in :D
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#19
Greg B said:
We were first exposed to Julius Ceasar and it probably has potential for a leadership spin.
Julius Caesar has loads of potential for issues such as leadership, loyalty and trust. Of course, now that I think about it, I even managed to put a twist on JC...my group turned that play into a comedy.

wolfnature said:
You just had to bring up the NHL. I'm trying to get over that tragedy

Although I'll bet if The Great One were to ask for that tape you might give in
Tragedy? I thought the NHL talks were more of a dark comedy. :D

Sorry, The Great One, for all of his hockey ability, would be unable to sway me on this tape. Maurice Richard, perhaps, but not Wayne.

Hey, Craig! There's a new leadership paper for you! Leadership within the NHL...it'd be a short paper!

I believe Claes mentioned "The Taming of the Shrew". Was that so much an example of Leadership or perhaps more in line with another of the Quality Management Principles - 'Factual approach to decision making'. TTotS had some people jumping to conclusions before receiving all of the facts.

There you go, Craig...a real paper for you...Shakespeare's Guide to the Quality Management Principles! :D
 
L

little__cee

#20
Excellent

I admit that I'm a product of a public school education in which I think I read some Romeo and Juliet and that was really about it. I managed to skip every classic known to the rest of the world, even though I think I turned out okay.

This was my first brush with Hamlet and yes I understood your article even though I had no prior knowledge of the plot details.

In a bit of irony, I read your article to avoid a horrible task of writing instructions for supervisors about how our new corrective action program will work once the 'overhaul' takes place. So, yes, I read about a 'hero' avoiding his given task while I was successfully avoiding my task...thought that make me a few of you smile. :agree1:
 
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