Simple ISO 9001:2015 Overview Presentation wanted

Sidney Vianna

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It's interesting that you say that the general population don't need to know anything about ISO.
JoShmo is correct. The vast majority of the workforce is not required to know anything about international standards their employers ascribe to comply with, just like most of the workforce is not required to know regulatory requirements the company is required to satisfy.

The conformance and compliance happens by deployment of policies, processes, procedures, systems, etc...

In my experience, subjecting the workers to unnecessary "ISO indoctrination/awareness sessions" is counterproductive. Most people end up confused and a typical unintended result is the dreaded reference to our "ISO procedures", our "ISO manual", "ISO this and ISO that". A clear symptom of a failed implementation.
 

mdurivage

Quite Involved in Discussions
ISO 14001:2015 mapped to ISO 9001:2015

Does anyone have a comparison of ISO 14001:2015 mapped to ISO 9001:2015?
 

Peter Fraser

Trusted Information Resource
JoShmo is correct. The vast majority of the workforce is not required to know anything about international standards their employers ascribe to comply with, just like most of the workforce is not required to know regulatory requirements the company is required to satisfy.

The conformance and compliance happens by deployment of policies, processes, procedures, systems, etc...

In my experience, subjecting the workers to unnecessary "ISO indoctrination/awareness sessions" is counterproductive. Most people end up confused and a typical unintended result is the dreaded reference to our "ISO procedures", our "ISO manual", "ISO this and ISO that". A clear symptom of a failed implementation.

Sidney is of course spot on when he says that "conformance and compliance happens by" doing things (I paraphrase).
But the ISO presentation to which he linked earlier suggests that "A quality management system is a way of defining how an organization can meet ... requirements...", which gives the impression that a QMS is documentation.
What is key to "getting the message across" to staff is that what they do matters, not what is written down somewhere.
 

charanjit singh

Involved In Discussions
Very informative post by Sydney. In stead of an elaborate documentation - which most people may be loathe to read any way- one can make a pictorial representation of how the QMS is being implemented or is proposed to be implemented. It should be made as close as possible to the activities of one's own organisation to make it more relevant and better understood by the target audience.
 

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
It's interesting that you say that the general population don't need to know anything about ISO. When a previous company I worked at went for ISO14001 certification, the auditor interviewed 15 people picked at random and asked them if they knew what ISO14001 was and what the company policy was and what it meant for them in their day to day activities. If we hadn't have done awareness sessions with everyone, we would have had an issue with this I feel.
Also, in the past, anyway, was the standard "What does the company quality policy mean to you?" that the auditors had to ask of a sample of people.

JoShmo is correct. The vast majority of the workforce is not required to know anything about international standards their employers ascribe to comply with, just like most of the workforce is not required to know regulatory requirements the company is required to satisfy.

The conformance and compliance happens by deployment of policies, processes, procedures, systems, etc...

In my experience, subjecting the workers to unnecessary "ISO indoctrination/awareness sessions" is counterproductive. Most people end up confused and a typical unintended result is the dreaded reference to our "ISO procedures", our "ISO manual", "ISO this and ISO that". A clear symptom of a failed implementation.
In the "early" days it had more significance because an "implementation" was often a significant event in a company. I did a lot of company wide "What is this ISO thing" because it explained to workers what was happening (such as why one or more persons, typically from outside the company) were nosing around, asking questions, and, significantly, it was typical for the workers to never have gone through an audit. I remember the days of teaching the employees how to go through an audit - How to respond in an audit.

While these days making all employees aware of the basics of ISO 9001, at least what it meant to them and their jobs, I don't believe it is always a waste of time. It doesn't have to be a detailed explanation of the standard.

When I was doing a lot of implementations years ago I found a basic "About ISO 9001" presentation made my job easier, helped the employees understand what was going on, and how it affected them. It also was a method to make the employees feel that they were involved in/part of the implementation project and that there was not some hidden agenda or a "secret project" that upper management was laying on them.

When JoShmo says: "The vast majority of the workforce is not required to know anything about international standards their employers ascribe to comply with..." he is right. Then again, when a company first implements ISO 9001 it is typically company wide and some aspect(s) of ISO 9001 apply to every employee. Educating the workforce and "keeping them in the loop" shouldn't be looked at as wasted time. At the very least it helps them understand what ISO 9001 is and how it will affect them in their specific jobs. Like I say - It doesn't have to be a detailed explanation of the entire contents of the standard.

If: "...Most people end up confused..." the problem is in the presentation content. Personally I used to have several "presentations", each focused on/targeting different groups in the company/organization.
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Attachments

  • QA Policy Cards.doc
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  • Area Check List Cards.doc
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  • ISO 9001 Overview.pptx
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  • Employee and Escort Pre-Audit Training.pptx
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  • ISO9001 Employee Training.ppt
    1,014.5 KB · Views: 1,556

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
More examples attached. Just modify for the 2015 version of ISO 9001
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Attachments

  • ISO 9001 Manager Awareness.ppt
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  • Supervisor_Awareness ISO9K.ppt
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  • Employee_awareness.ppt
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  • Awareness_Posters circa 1996.ppt
    308 KB · Views: 458
  • Employee_Awareness1098.doc
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J

JoShmo

Knowing ISO for an organization's worksforce is like a family knwing the building code their home was constructed to meet... useless, for the mostpart.
 

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
I've never considered ignorance as a positive aspect.

You really may want to rethink your post. Many people live in areas which are, for example, earthquake prone and/or flood prone. If a person is wanting to buy a house in such an area it would, in my opinion, make a lot of sense knowing the building code their home was constructed to meet.

When I bought this house I was very interested in the building codes at the time it was built. I know quite a few people who now *wish* they had looked into aspects such as the building code their home was constructed to meet. I know one gal who didn't care only to have it burn down - Turned out her house was "all aluminum" wiring.

My house - All copper wiring, copper plumbing and a number of other things which I specifically wanted. I looked at insulation codes of the time my house was built. I went so far as to go to the county to get copies of the house plans that was submitted. I even talked with the county engineers about the house. It was, according to city records, built in 1967. As they pointed out the drawings were submitted in 1967 but the house was actually built in 1968-69. I also found the building plans for the house in the attic after I bought it and matched them against what was submitted to the county.

Some aspects were especially important when I renovated the house, such as requirements at the time for air conditioning duct insulation (see attachment). I had about 20" of insulation pumped into the attic (after the attached picture was taken).

Knowledge. Planning. Educate your employees - They will thank you for it. Leaving them ignorant will do you more harm than good.

:2cents:
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Attachments

  • Simple ISO 9001:2015 Overview Presentation wanted
    8466 arial view of house and roof.gif
    188.5 KB · Views: 206
  • Simple ISO 9001:2015 Overview Presentation wanted
    Attic_air_conditioning_ducts0061.gif
    251.7 KB · Views: 195
  • AC Mods March 2007.ppt
    1.2 MB · Views: 248
J

JoShmo

That's different! You are thinking and acting like management, as if they were acquiring another ISO'd business - finding out if it was really compliant. For those who buy new - like most businesses who go for ISO, the people who live in the QMS don't need to know anything about the code, if it's the latest or anything else. That's what the code inspector is for. I've thought about it alot.
 

Sidney Vianna

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Re: ISO 14001:2015 mapped to ISO 9001:2015

Does anyone have a comparison of ISO 14001:2015 mapped to ISO 9001:2015?
With both documents following the ISO HLS, all of the sections are titled and numbered the same, isn't it? On top of that, the discipline-specific additional requirements would be added.

What comparison were you looking for?
 
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