Six countries that make up half the world?s population

Ajit Basrur

Staff member
Admin
#1
http://blogs.marketwatch.com/themar...he-worlds-population/?mod=MW_home_latest_news


More than 7.2 billion people exist in the world today with half the global population residing in just six countries, United Nations data show.

China and India have some of the biggest populations with more than 1 billion people each. And those numbers are projected to get even bigger, especially in urban areas.

The U.N. reported this month that more than half the globe?s inhabitants now live in cities with China, India and Nigeria forecast to see the most urban growth over the next 30 years. India is expected to add 404 million people to its cities by 2050. Its capital city Delhi ranks as the second largest in the world with 25 million inhabitants. The city has more than doubled in size since 1990.

Twenty-four years ago, there were 10 megacities with populations pushing above the 10 million mark. Today, there are 28 megacities with areas of developing nations seeing faster growth: 16 in Asia, four in Latin America, three in Africa, three in Europe and two in North America.

In China, Shanghai (23 million) and Beijing (20 million) are listed among the top 10 largest cities.

Tokyo is the biggest city in the world with 38 million people. In the U.S., New York and Newark are combined and rank ninth with 18 million people. New York?s ranking is expected to drop to 14th place by 2030 ? it was in third place in 1990. Overall, the U.S.?s population growth is expected to slow over the next few decades, according to the Pew Research Center.

The world is expected to have 41 sprawling megacities over the next few decades with developing nations representing the majority of that growth. The U.N. report spells out the development challenges these cities will soon face including the need to expand services in health care, education, transportation, housing and sanitation to accommodate population growth.

The U.N. projects that by 2050, two-thirds of the world will be living in cities.
 
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PaulJSmith

#2
I moved out of a city of a little over 30,000 about 9 years ago, and now live on a small farm in Southern Illinois. I can't say I miss it at all. In fact, I wish I'd done it sooner.
 
#3
Wow, that's surprising to me - I never would have pegged Tokyo as being the most populous (would have thought for sure that it would have been in China or India). Of course, the definition of "city" in reference to Tokyo is a bit different - it's actually a large, complex metropolitan area (23 separate "cities" if you will, combined as Tokyo).
 

kgott

Quite Involved in Discussions
#4
Hence some evidence for the depopulation agenda as is claimed the elites have.

The OECD counteries account for about 75% of the world economy but only about 30% of the world population. The BRICS counteries (including Russia) with about 70% of the world population are moving away from the US dollar as a reserve currency.

Hence the desperation of the US to size the pipeline line from Russia to Europe so they can strangle Europe to what ever degree is necessary to force them to keep the US dollar as a reserve currency.

What would happen if the trickle of counteries turning away from using the US dollar as a reserve currency turned into a flood?

See PaulCraigRoberts.com
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#5
I moved out of a city of a little over 30,000 about 9 years ago, and now live on a small farm in Southern Illinois. I can't say I miss it at all. In fact, I wish I'd done it sooner.
I do NOT like cities either. When I moved to where I am today back in the 1990's it was all farm land and bits of forest. Now it has built up all around me. I'm lucky because I have a 140 acre buffer. There are horse pastures on each side of the house and it's really nice seeing the horses and their antics.

Look up 8466 Lesourdsville-West Chester Road, West Chester, OH 45069 on Google Earth.

I am seriously thinking of moving to western Colorado where some friends of mine live.

This is just an example of the "future" of the US:

Endangered Florida Forest Will Be Destroyed To Make Room For Walmart And Chik-Fil-A http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/07/16/3460293/florida-forest-destroyed-walmart/

Add in the fracking pollution and all that and the US will soon be toast. I'm glad I'm old and probably won't be around to see it as things come tumbling down... In the meantime :popcorn:

<snip> Hence the desperation of the US to size the pipeline line from Russia to Europe so they can strangle Europe to what ever degree is necessary to force them to keep the US dollar as a reserve currency.

What would happen if the trickle of counteries turning away from using the US dollar as a reserve currency turned into a flood?

See PaulCraigRoberts.com
Or see Zerohedge.com for some depressing info...
 
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PaulJSmith

#6
Look up 8466 Lesourdsville-West Chester Road, West Chester, OH 45069 on Google Earth.
Ouch. Is that the Elsmar Ranch? You really are surrounded. That's a shame. I hate to see that happen. Our area is still quite rural, but not for lack of trying. Some of the smaller farms have sold to developers who've subdivided and built multi-home properties. No suburban neighborhoods yet, but it's probably only a matter of time for us, too. Sad, really, as the Mississippi valley around here is some of the most fertile and productive farmland in the world. I suspect it's the same around the Ohio River as well.
 
#7
I live in a smallish community (Dayton, about 9,000 people) outside a small town (Carson City, about 54,000 people) with Reno (225,000 people) about 45 minutes to 1 hour away. The Dayton community grew from about 7,000 people to 9,000 since I moved there. I have to remember when I moved in, I added to the population. Other people have the same desires to 'get away from people'.

I have been approached by members of the community to sign a petition to 'limit growth', i.e., not allow new people to move into the area. I find this hypocritical as most of the people who are trying to get the petition signed moved into the area from California (at least that is my guess and my prejudice against Californians does not allow me to alter my position :) --hey at least I am honest about my prejudice).
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#8
Ouch. Is that the Elsmar Ranch? You really are surrounded. <snip>
Yup - And it was all farms and tree stands back then. They even put in another expressway interchange down the road about a mile or so.

The only "good" thing is within 3 miles are a new major hospital, all sorts of restaurants (even though I very rarely eat out) and - Well, it's close to many things. It's also a relatively secure area right where I am. Boehner lives just up the road from me and cops are always going up and down the road - state, county and local. One other nice thing - The road in front of me gets very little traffic other than some during the morning and evening rush hour so it's quiet. Expressway isn't too far away but I rarely hear it except sometimes during the winter when the windows are closed anyway.

But - So it goes. I really don't have much to complain about.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#9
I live in the DC/Baltimore/Phila/Newark/NYC/Boston suburban sprawl.
My house sits on what used to be a protected wildlife refuge.

Every year I get a week to spend in McCoy Colorado. Takes a day or two to remember that I don't have to start sprinting when I wake up...and then it's just the sounds of birds and the smell of horses.
Only 11 more months til I get to go again !

Looking forward to getting farther away from cities more often.
 

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