SMED Classroom Exercise to show operators the importance of SMED

8balluk

Starting to get Involved
#1
Hi All,

Has anyone got any classroom exercises in order to show operators the importance of SMED.

Ive got the presentation ready but was looking for an involement exercise that will let them see the potential of SMED

Regards
8balluk:bigwave:
 
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S

S Johnson

#2
Re: SMED Classroom Exercise

I don't have something written out, but I've used a three step process of making paper airplane models. Starting off with batch manufacturing with long change over times, then going to one piece flow using SMED to make it possible. I would throw in last minute changes to customer demand, or requests for new colors, etc. and let the audience compare how batch manufacturing deals with it to how well one piece flow handles it.
 
S

sfkevin

#3
Re: SMED Classroom Exercise

I also do not have anything written down, but we used LEGO blocks and a plan for building the planes with a set time limit then count the number completed. We worked it the same way S Johnson did it. It was easy to see the changes after running it different ways.
 
W

wmarhel

#4
Re: SMED Classroom Exercise

For a quick, down and dirty exercise that stresses the use of SMED and standardized work is to go to the local store and buy four of the small Lego kits. They are typically $5-6 each and use them in the following manner:

1) Complete one of the models to use a sample. Better yet, if you have kids, let them complete it. :)

The following will be used in the classroom exercise:

2) Take one of the kits and spread the pieces over three or four areas around the person who will complete the kit. It has to be far enough for them to actually move away from their workspace to get a piece. They DON'T get a copy of the directions contained in the box, nor do they get the box. (THIS REPRESENTS A CURRENT STATE THAT MANY MANUFACTURERS EXIST. NO STANDARDIZED WORK AND MATERIALS ARE TYPICALLY SPREAD OUT) They are allowed to see and study the completed model for 30 seconds.


3) This person is allowed to have all the pieces at their workstation, and the box, but NO DIRECTIONS. This represents a better state of organization, but the lack of directions (standardized work) is intentional. They are also allowed to see and study the completed model for 30 seconds.


4) This person is allowed to have all the pieces at their workstation, is allowed to keep the box (for the picture) and is allowed to have the directions. This is an even better state where more organization and better instructions (standardized work) are available. They are also allowed to study the completed model for 30 seconds.

Have them all start at the same moment and with a stopwatch running, record the length of time it takes to have a properly completed unit. It's typically a lot of fun for the group and generates lot's of laughs.

Wayne
 
A

Ashmot - 2010

#6
Re: SMED Classroom Exercise

For a quick, down and dirty exercise that stresses the use of SMED and standardized work is to go to the local store and buy four of the small Lego kits. They are typically $5-6 each and use them in the following manner:

1) Complete one of the models to use a sample. Better yet, if you have kids, let them complete it. :)

The following will be used in the classroom exercise:

2) Take one of the kits and spread the pieces over three or four areas around the person who will complete the kit. It has to be far enough for them to actually move away from their workspace to get a piece. They DON'T get a copy of the directions contained in the box, nor do they get the box. (THIS REPRESENTS A CURRENT STATE THAT MANY MANUFACTURERS EXIST. NO STANDARDIZED WORK AND MATERIALS ARE TYPICALLY SPREAD OUT) They are allowed to see and study the completed model for 30 seconds.


3) This person is allowed to have all the pieces at their workstation, and the box, but NO DIRECTIONS. This represents a better state of organization, but the lack of directions (standardized work) is intentional. They are also allowed to see and study the completed model for 30 seconds.


4) This person is allowed to have all the pieces at their workstation, is allowed to keep the box (for the picture) and is allowed to have the directions. This is an even better state where more organization and better instructions (standardized work) are available. They are also allowed to study the completed model for 30 seconds.

Have them all start at the same moment and with a stopwatch running, record the length of time it takes to have a properly completed unit. It's typically a lot of fun for the group and generates lot's of laughs.

Wayne
Wayne,
Pretty clever and simple.
I have been trying to develop a simulation using a similar method (using Lego) but never thought of this.
Thanks:thanx:
 
A

adrianpask - 2011

#7
I do quite a bit of SMED implementation and training in the UK and found that even the word "SMED" can turn some teams off so i talk about "pit stop changeovers" and use a racing Grand Prix analogy. Therefore for the training exercise.....we go changing a car tyre. It's a lot of fun and when the teams go from an average of 15min to sub 30s it gets very competitive!
 
J

Juan Dude

#8
I hate to play the devil’s advocate because even though the ideas presented here are brilliant and do a wonderful job of illustrating the need for organization and documented work instructions in manufacturing processes do they really show operators the importance of SMED as the original posters request?
 
A

adrianpask - 2011

#9
I hate to play the devil’s advocate because even though the ideas presented here are brilliant and do a wonderful job of illustrating the need for organization and documented work instructions in manufacturing processes do they really show operators the importance of SMED as the original posters request?

Hi Juan,

Really good point.

For me i want to achieve 2 things when training. I want people to understand the importance and theoretical application of SMED and most importantly to be confident in their ability to implement the process on their own. With this in mind please allow me to share a 2 day course i ran on SMED in a bottling factory in France last week.

On day 1 after a very quick pre-frame of the 2 days (and me explaining the quality of my aweful French) we went straight outside to change a car wheel with a video recorder running.
- The first attempt took them just over 9min (pretty quick for a first attempt).

- We then returned to the classroom, and carried out the SMED process in stages i.e. introduce a stage an implement it on our recorded changeover.

- After 3 hours we then returned to the car and the team changed wheel in under 1m 20s - a good 80% ish improvement. Huge emphasis on creating good working instructions and SOP's. We often write the SOP on a flip chart page and stick it to the car, modifying it as we repeat the changeover.

- From here we then go to the production line to record a real life changeover on the line and then close day 1.

Day 2:
- I open with a very fun 90min exercise that challenges people on their ability to set and achieve targets and to deal with failure. We then carry out SMED on their recording from the close of day 1.
- The team took their real changeover from 43min to 16min through this process.

So does this teach the importance of SMED? Absolutely. By the end of day 1 the team have implemented a process using the SMED process, created simple detailed work instructions that they update in real time, and achieved a great result. When we then implement on the line we take the learnings from the car exercise and really embed. I suppose for some trainers this could be a pretty high risk strategy in a training course - it's important to pick the right procedure to practice on and to be prepared for potential issues.

Having run numerous SMED courses in this way i find that teams finish not only realising the importance of smed, but have real practical experience of implementing it on the line. In my opinion this is the most effective way of embedding the importance of SMED in teams.

Post the training session i run some facilitation with senior management to work out £££ payback values for taking the training further and for creating milestone plans to implement on multiple lines. By the way it's worth mentioning that before deciding on running smed my team always checks that changeover is worth >10% of loss - no point reducing changeover time if the machines are just going to break down!
 

8balluk

Starting to get Involved
#10
Hi Juan,

Really good point.

For me i want to achieve 2 things when training. I want people to understand the importance and theoretical application of SMED and most importantly to be confident in their ability to implement the process on their own. With this in mind please allow me to share a 2 day course i ran on SMED in a bottling factory in France last week.

On day 1 after a very quick pre-frame of the 2 days (and me explaining the quality of my aweful French) we went straight outside to change a car wheel with a video recorder running.
- The first attempt took them just over 9min (pretty quick for a first attempt).

- We then returned to the classroom, and carried out the SMED process in stages i.e. introduce a stage an implement it on our recorded changeover.

- After 3 hours we then returned to the car and the team changed wheel in under 1m 20s - a good 80% ish improvement. Huge emphasis on creating good working instructions and SOP's. We often write the SOP on a flip chart page and stick it to the car, modifying it as we repeat the changeover.

- From here we then go to the production line to record a real life changeover on the line and then close day 1.

Day 2:
- I open with a very fun 90min exercise that challenges people on their ability to set and achieve targets and to deal with failure. We then carry out SMED on their recording from the close of day 1.
- The team took their real changeover from 43min to 16min through this process.

So does this teach the importance of SMED? Absolutely. By the end of day 1 the team have implemented a process using the SMED process, created simple detailed work instructions that they update in real time, and achieved a great result. When we then implement on the line we take the learnings from the car exercise and really embed. I suppose for some trainers this could be a pretty high risk strategy in a training course - it's important to pick the right procedure to practice on and to be prepared for potential issues.

Having run numerous SMED courses in this way i find that teams finish not only realising the importance of smed, but have real practical experience of implementing it on the line. In my opinion this is the most effective way of embedding the importance of SMED in teams.

Post the training session i run some facilitation with senior management to work out £££ payback values for taking the training further and for creating milestone plans to implement on multiple lines. By the way it's worth mentioning that before deciding on running smed my team always checks that changeover is worth >10% of loss - no point reducing changeover time if the machines are just going to break down!

Thanks for that Adrian. Very good example.

One thing though. In the current state of changing a tyre how many people change the tyre?

Thanks
 
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