SOPs availability on-site

Fatima97

Starting to get Involved
Hello Everyone

Our factory is divided into 5 processes, each process has several lines, and each line has a different SOP. Currently, we're printing the SOPs and put it somewhere near the machine. Before every IATF/ISO9001 audit or any external audit, the team reprint SOPs that have updates. The actual situation is that operators don't really look at it daily though.
I was thinking of instead of printing, make the SOPs available to the operators electronically to be read in a PC that is available in each of the Processes departments (1 PC per department)
Would that cause any possible non-conformity of OFI in any audit?
 

ChrisM

Quite Involved in Discussions
By going to an electronic version you eliminate the possibility of an out-of-date paper version being used. However you still have to make sure that the copies available on the PCs are the latest only (e.g. no saving of the files to the local PC) and you still have to find a way of making sure that the process operators do actually read them......
 

Fatima97

Starting to get Involved
By going to an electronic version you eliminate the possibility of an out-of-date paper version being used. However you still have to make sure that the copies available on the PCs are the latest only (e.g. no saving of the files to the local PC) and you still have to find a way of making sure that the process operators do actually read them......
My idea is to make available only the newest live versions that is controlled by each area responsible. and after moving to electronic versions, we'll do a training to operators on how to reach their respective SOP.
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
Electronic is fine. What you’ll need to insure is that your employees can access them when asked. My guess is an auditor will confirm that they are being followed and then ask random operators how they can find them. Since they won’t access them regularly, it is easily “forgotten.”.
 

yodon

Leader
Super Moderator
operators don't really look at it daily though
I hesitate to bring this up, but whether the SOPs are on paper or electronic, if the operators don't look at them, it hardly matters! I think this may point to a bit of a deeper problem to solve.

Are they really needed? (Presume not if the operators don't read them).

Before every IATF/ISO9001 audit or any external audit
This also ruffled my feathers a bit. You shouldn't need to be doing anything before (for) an audit.
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
I hesitate to bring this up, but whether the SOPs are on paper or electronic, if the operators don't look at them, it hardly matters! I think this may point to a bit of a deeper problem to solve.

Are they really needed? (Presume not if the operators don't read them).
SOPs are there for the "next guy" or to refresh recollection. We have people working the same parts for 20+ years. They don't really need our documentation -- heck, they helped write it in many cases. It's there, if they need it. But they generally go about their day to day business. It becomes really helpful with that job we may have no run for the last year or so -- the one nobody "remembers."
 

yodon

Leader
Super Moderator
@Golfman25 - that makes sense, of course. I just got the impression that this was only being done "for show" (for the sake of auditors). Maybe reading too much into it. I just see, too often, the lack of focus on competence and reliance on "show."
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
@Golfman25 - that makes sense, of course. I just got the impression that this was only being done "for show" (for the sake of auditors). Maybe reading too much into it. I just see, too often, the lack of focus on competence and reliance on "show."
You have to bamboozle the auditors somehow. :)
 

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Leader
Super Moderator
You have to bamboozle the auditors somehow. :)
As long as the whole thing isn’t a charade.:nope:

On another note as I have posted many times when I worked at Honda and with Toyota and in several of my own manufacturign lines that were lean (each sep took about a minute) we didn’t have work instructions for the line operators. At all. Oh engineers knew teh path of teh product and when and where materials were to be delivered, but teh line operators - no. They were trained by a lead operator adn they were instrumental in the process design phase in determining what step did what tasks. At about a minute a step they could easily develop muscle memory and knew what to do. If they went too slow or too fast or the line would stop or backup so we knew if something went wrong. This is a core principle of TPS and the operators could always explain what tey were doing. Sometimes WIs are not necessary. And in others a simple flow chart or one page listing of the important things like parameter settings and QC check is all that is necessary. We need to think about what we really need not what will satisfy the most simplistic auditor…
 

Sebastian

Trusted Information Resource
Going online brings new trouble - contingency plan.
How to run production when SOP server went down?
 
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