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Tasked with revamping our Website using Dreamweaver 8

J
#1
Hello,

Just wondering if anyone has experience with Dreamweaver software for creating web pages or with website creation in general.

I've been tasked with rebuilding our website and this is the software I was handed. It's taking some time to learn it and I do/will have questions and would like to hook up with some who can help guide me. It just doesn't seem that user freindly.:bonk:

There is such a broad experience here that I'm sure that someone will be able to help.


Thanks in advance.

James
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#2
What do you want to know? I use Dreamweaver for pages and Fireworks for images.

If you don't know html it will be more of a learning experience than you probably envision. Like a friend of mine bought some 'simple to use' design software and abandoned it for a pencil drawing when he found that no matter how you look at it it will be a learning experience. Of course, then he found that the city required a real architect to produce the drawings (and to code!)... Point being is like almost all software, Dreamweaver has a learning curve associated with it.

That said, you probably don't have a very complex web site - Or do you? Is it a simple site, or do you have stuff like part number look-ups and such?
 
C

chergh - 2008

#3
Put Dreamweaver away then go and buy a decent book to learn html. Once you can write a simple webpage using nothing but the windows notepad then it's time to start using Dreamweaver.

If your wanting your webpage to do anything more than look nice you will probably have to look at learning a scripting language, I would point you in the direction of Javascript here (not to be confused with Java).
 
Last edited by a moderator:
J

jem63

#4
Hands down-

If you want a professional looking dynamic website that attracts you should shop it out to a professional. In the long run it may be cheaper to outsource it than it would be for you to take on the task. For what they do in 10 hours may take you 50+.

If you are interested in shopping it out please private message me I can point you in the right direction.


:)
 
W

wmarhel

#5
Dreamweaver is a nice program. Like Marc, I typically use this along Fireworks as they both are fairly user friendly. The level of webpage you want can be fairly easily adapted in Dreamweaver as it can handle a wide range of formats, options, etc.

I'm currently in the process of developing a website and both Fireworks and Dreamweaver are my tools of choice. Of course, you can talk to a dozen different people and they may have different opinions. The big debate used to be between Adobe's GoLive and Macromedia's Dreamweaver, although DW usually ended up ahead. Chergh makes a good point, it is still useful to understand html code as sometimes you needed to look at the code in order to find the problem.

Another option you might consider is the use of a Content Management System (CMS). Some of these can be clumsy in the set-up, but allow for a more dynamic approach to changes. This is especially important where the people who may be responsible for adding/changing information only need add or modify text. This method allows someone other than a member of the I.T. department to perform the necessary action.

Wayne
 

Kales Veggie

People: The Vital Few
#6
I agree with the previous posts.

Sketch out on paper what you want the pages to look like and what kind of functionality (forms, ecommerce, etc) you need and have a software professional program it for a fixed price.

It will be more effective and cost less in the end. (unless you want to be the Dreamweaver expert for your company and the company has given you "unlimited salaried" time to get the website completed)... unlikely.
 
J
#7
Thanks for all the responses.

The learning curve is not a problem, I don't mind that.
If anything, my problem is patience. I tend to get ahead of myself.
For instance, I started out building the page in the tutorial but then started messing around with one of the prepared page designs. Of course then I run into things I'm not prepared for. AHHH well -- all part of the curve.

I do apprecieate the input on the usability of Dreamweaver. It gives me confidence that I'm working with a good program. Also I'll get into the HTML. I've messed with it in the past, but never seriously. I can do some editing, but have never tried writing in HTML. I'll have to look into Fireworks as I haven't been exposed to that one.

Having folks available who know the software will be a big help. Thanks.

Jem63: Yes we could parcel it out, but then I wouldn't learn anything. Since I am semi-retired I look at it as a challenge and look forward to mastering the system.

James
 
J

jem63

#8
Thanks for all the responses.

The learning curve is not a problem, I don't mind that.
If anything, my problem is patience. I tend to get ahead of myself.
For instance, I started out building the page in the tutorial but then started messing around with one of the prepared page designs. Of course then I run into things I'm not prepared for. AHHH well -- all part of the curve.

I do apprecieate the input on the usability of Dreamweaver. It gives me confidence that I'm working with a good program. Also I'll get into the HTML. I've messed with it in the past, but never seriously. I can do some editing, but have never tried writing in HTML. I'll have to look into Fireworks as I haven't been exposed to that one.

Having folks available who know the software will be a big help. Thanks.

Jem63: Yes we could parcel it out, but then I wouldn't learn anything. Since I am semi-retired I look at it as a challenge and look forward to mastering the system.

James

Good luck on your endeavor:)

Please keep me posted as i am interested to see what you come up with.:)
 
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