Tesla Lacks Major Automotive Quality Certifications such as IATF 16949 and ISO 9001

Sidney Vianna

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Boeing is not certified
Boeing has a pretty good number of business units and plants that are certified to AS9100 and other standards. Boeing Commercial Aircraft is not certified, in contrast with its main commercial rival, Airbus, who, interestingly, has outsold BCA for a while, especially in the narrow body segment.
Tesla Lacks Major Automotive Quality Certifications such as IATF 16949 and ISO 9001
 

Mike S.

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Also I dealt with a BDS unit that was not AS9100 or ISO 9001 certified. But they were VERY quality oriented.
 

Bran

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Even without enforcing IATF certification on their supply base, Tesla and other similar OEMs benefit at least somewhat from the IATF scheme. Suppliers can just as easily get dinged for not meeting an IATF requirement on a Tesla or Denso part as they can for a Ford or GM part.

IATF OEMs seem a bit naive to think they will never have competition...
 

outdoorsNW

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I am now working at a large startup, and everyone in the quality department and finally some people outside of quality see how the process of getting 9001 certified will result in many process problems (poor, missing, etc.) being fixed to be compliant with 9001.

A certification does not guarantee quality, and non-certified companies can have great quality.

If a company goes for real compliance and not paper pushing when getting certified, the standard can serve as a guideline of what needs to be considered to improve quality (results may vary) and prompt a company to implement processes that either were a low priority to get implemented or not even considered previously.

Like others, I have seen plenty of certified companies where I question how they stay certified because they have many repeat quality problems where the root cause seems to be a violation of the quality standard the company is certified to.
 

Sidney Vianna

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Like others, I have seen plenty of certified companies where I question how they stay certified because they have many repeat quality problems where the root cause seems to be a violation of the quality standard the company is certified to.
And this is only possible because the overwhelming majority of customers decide it is not worth to engage the CB that maintains these façade certificates. Over the years, I've mentioned this so many times. E.g., Trusting ISO 13485 Certification of a Supplier... A Sad Story

Unfortunately, the CB's that issue and maintain façade certificates for substandard suppliers are given a pass because users of the certificates never want to engage with them nor the accreditation bodies that keep such certification bodies accredited. No wonder there is an erosion in the "credibility" of system certificates. And the ISO 9001 Brand Integrity Working Group is so powerless and/or useless to revert the trend. As ISO themselves state in this brochure:

"...If you are still not satisfied with the response from your supplier, and if they are certified by an independent (third-party) certification body (registrar), you should bring the matter to the certification body’s attention. You can find the certification body’s name by looking at your supplier’s certificate. The certification body will investigate the problems during their surveillance audits of your supplier’s QMS, or, in critical cases, may decide to carry out an additional specific investigation..."
 

Jimmy123

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Absolutely. There may be a positive correlation between better quality and certification to a QMS standard, but we all know the R-squared on that correlation is definitely not one! Several of the worst suppliers I have ever seen or experienced were either ISO9001 or AS9100 certified. I'm betting that there are IATF 16949 organizations like this.

Boeing is not certified but, aside from some more recent issues, have built some darn fine flying machines of all types and sizes.
Boing was grounded, because of serious failures, isn’t it. But Boing follow the Aerospace standards.
 

Jimmy123

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I am now working at a large startup, and everyone in the quality department and finally some people outside of quality see how the process of getting 9001 certified will result in many process problems (poor, missing, etc.) being fixed to be compliant with 9001.

A certification does not guarantee quality, and non-certified companies can have great quality.

If a company goes for real compliance and not paper pushing when getting certified, the standard can serve as a guideline of what needs to be considered to improve quality (results may vary) and prompt a company to implement processes that either were a low priority to get implemented or not even considered previously.

Like others, I have seen plenty of certified companies where I question how they stay certified because they have many repeat quality problems where the root cause seems to be a violation of the quality standard the company is certified to.
A certification does not guarantee quality, and non-certified companies can have great quality.

yes, but ask the statistic. You can strongly smoke and can be 100 years old, too. The probability is not very high.
 
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