The days before International Standards - Has ISO done what it was supposed to?

S

statdoug

#1
I found myself reminiscing today on my early days before ISO. I was in the Automotive OEM market, and we used to get regular visits from Ford and GM with the occasional Chrysler Pentastar audit thrown in for good measure. Ford had one set of rules, GM another, and we would switch our systems back and forth depending on who was coming in. Our (homegrown) software would calculate CPs one way for Ford and another for GM. We had to make radical changes for every visit.

I would ask, especially of those other old-timers out there, what do you remember of the days before International Standards?
 

somashekar

Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
The days before International Standards

The beauty of international standards is that there are so many international standards, technical specification, customer specific requirements, interested parties requirements, legal and other requirements, statutory and regulatory requirements, and most important..... Your business requirements
:applause: :D :notme: :mg: :bonk: :frust: :lmao: :agree: :cfingers: :2cents:
 

John Broomfield

Staff member
Super Moderator
#3
I found myself reminiscing today on my early days before ISO. I was in the Automotive OEM market, and we used to get regular visits from Ford and GM with the occasional Chrysler Pentastar audit thrown in for good measure. Ford had one set of rules, GM another, and we would switch our systems back and forth depending on who was coming in. Our (homegrown) software would calculate CPs one way for Ford and another for GM. We had to make radical changes for every visit.

I would ask, especially of those other old-timers out there, what do you remember of the days before International Standards?
statdoug,

It terms of harmonizing national standards, yes. But ISO has no brief to harmonize industry standards.

Every customer organization thinks it is different. And this viewpoint is probably necessary for sustaining competitiveness and innovation.

Our experience of industry standards can then continue to drive improvements to international standards as they widen what is considered good practice.

John
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#4
I found myself reminiscing today on my early days before ISO. I was in the Automotive OEM market <snip>
Are you asking specifically about automotive companies? Ford, GM and Chrysler dreamed up QS9000, if you remember, and they didn't stop doing their own, individual customer audits with their own customer specific requirements which were not addressed in QS9000 or it's "replacement" by TS 16949. And TS 16949 replaced QS9000 because the automotive industry wanted to "jump ship" for responsibility for upkeep of QS9000. Also remember - It is TS 16949 (a "technical standard), not ISO 16949, so technically it is not a typical ISO standard such as ISO 9001 is. :2cents:
 
S

statdoug

#5
Are you asking specifically about automotive companies? Ford, GM and Chrysler dreamed up QS9000, if you remember, and they didn't stop doing their own, individual customer audits with their own customer specific requirements which were not addressed in QS9000 or it's "replacement" by TS 16949. And TS 16949 replaced QS9000 because the automotive industry wanted to "jump ship" for responsibility for upkeep of QS9000. Also remember - It is TS 16949 (a "technical standard), not ISO 16949, so technically it is not a typical ISO standard such as ISO 9001 is. :2cents:
Automotive was my industry at the time, but I worked with and saw others. I am really more interested in hearing stories about the positives and negatives that people remember or have seen change over the years. It would also be interesting to see data on changes to productivity, Quality, industrial reliability, etc., if any one has such.
 
S

Shoes

#6
I believe all standards appear to be a never ending circle that provides fear when first encountered, then acceptance, then confidence in a product. You can have a little fun with it along the way. This is from a former co-workers web site, he is now solely a wine maker and a very funny guy:

Producing Tasty Pinot Noir since 1999 WITHOUT the "benefit" of ISO 9000 Certification!
 
#7
If we are clear that we're NOT talking about certification, but the implementation of a QMS based upon ISO 9000, then yes! I worked in a car plant (very old one) where just writing down the assembly methods at each station etc improved the "FTC" by 46%!
 
S

statdoug

#8
Good example, and nicely qualified. There are many facets, and it is nice to have the particular aspect associated with the anecdote.
 

Top Bottom