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The hospital: Worst place to be, especially if you're sick

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#21
D'Oh!

I wend through a lower GI issue about a month ago (diverticulitis was the diagnosis until I can get a GI doc to do the in *ahem* depth examination).
Luckily I wasn't hospitalized.
But I'm still recovering from the antibiotics.

I hope all is well now, Jim.
The lower GI exam (colonoscopy) isn't as bad as it once was, because now they knock you out (or at least render you senseless) before the procedure. The worst part is the day-before prep, (evacuation of everything) and that's not so bad either. Diverticulitis, if that's what you have, will mostly come down to diet unless it's a very severe case. Lots of fiber, and avoidance of things like nuts and other seeds that can be trapped in the diverticula.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#22
Don't agree. A couple of years ago, I suffered a heart attack (although it did not seem as bad as it sounds) and spent about a week in the Cardiac Care Ward of The John Radcliffe Hospital (Oxford - an NHS (not private) hospital) and the care I received was exemplary. The ward was a secure one (the door was locked to unauthorised visitors) and we even had a scheduled afternoon nap when the lights were dimmed and visitors were asked to leave. Apart from being in hospital, I did not want to be anywhere else.
I'm glad to hear that you had a good hospital experience, and I hope you're doing well now. :agree1:
 

Randy

Super Moderator
#23
Jim that sounds absolutely nasty and painful. The only thing remotely close was my hernia operation and that felt like a roto-rooter job.
 

lindal

Involved In Discussions
#24
Don't agree. A couple of years ago, I suffered a heart attack (although it did not seem as bad as it sounds) and spent about a week in the Cardiac Care Ward of The John Radcliffe Hospital (Oxford - an NHS (not private) hospital) and the care I received was exemplary. The ward was a secure one (the door was locked to unauthorised visitors) and we even had a scheduled afternoon nap when the lights were dimmed and visitors were asked to leave. Apart from being in hospital, I did not want to be anywhere else.
I agree that cardiac care has become much better in most hospitals over the past 15 years. Almost every hospital (at least in MN) has a cardiac cath lab staffed or on call 24-hrs a day. The reason for this is that there is a well-defined standard of care. Also, there has been a lot of research and money thrown into understanding user requirements for a patient population that will continue to have similar problems (repeat customer).
The medical device (GE, Boston, J&J) and pharmaceutical companies involved in cardiac intervention are huge and can force this standardization on the hospitals. Funny that standardization and quality tools would increase end-user satisfaction.
 

Rosalia Sgorbati

Starting to get Involved
#25
Re: Don't drink the water.

A BIG issue is "ego" of healthcare professionals with a "god complex" thinking their education and training makes them far superior to mere mortals. Heck - we can't even get them to wash their hands before and after tending a patient to protect themselves, let alone the next patient, from evil virus and bacteria transmission.!
That's sound new for me
 
#27
Re: Don't drink the water.


That's sound new for me
Joint Commission cracks down on hand hygiene

"Healthcare workers' compliance with hand hygiene programs still remains a challenge. The CDC estimates that on average healthcare providers wash their hands less than half of the times they should. "

Joseph Lister (for whom Listerine is apparently named) told us something like 150 years ago (1870 or thereabouts) to wash our hands but people are nonetheless not doing it. There are however automated compliance systems that remind people when they have not washed their hands. This is especially important as a lot of bugs are now antibiotic resistant but I do not think they are soap-resistant.

And yes, FMEA is applicable. Institute for Healthcare Improvement: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Tool Report It would be interesting to apply AIAG/VDA's new (2019) method to this situation.
 
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