Interesting Read Threaded ring gage calibration and tendonitis in the elbows

#1
I'm wondering if y'all are familiar with any increased rate of tendonitis in the elbow from constant threaded ring gage calibration. I'd assumed it was kind of a fluke when my left elbow started hurting when holding the larger set plugs while calibrating. Now my right elbow is hurting and I'm more than a little concerned. I kinda need my arms and hands to be functional to earn a living. I've been performing these calibrations for about 6 1/2 years now, current job, and am going to be putting the set plugs in a vice from now on. I've been using the vice for the larger sizes, over 1.75" or so, for some time but am thinking that's not enough. Do those of you who perform threaded ring gage calibration use a vice to hold the set plug? Is this common?
 

DietCokeofEvil

Involved In Discussions
#2
It can be an issue, which is why we try to rotate techs on thread ring calibration. I had to wear a tennis elbow cuff for a while. I never use a vice unless it's a large thread ring where I need both hands to turn the ring. I'd suggest a visit to the doctor or chiropractor to see what they say.
 
#3
I've been to a Dr. and they have confirmed that it's tendonitis. I'm not completely sure it's the calibration alone and not the cleaning and constant reaching/lifting of ring gages from all the tool boxes (gages are stored in the work areas through multiple buildings here). Since we've started recording as found conditions I've stopped using the ultra-sonic cleaner and clean them all by hand with brushes and isopropanol. Lots of holding ring gages and spinning brushes around inside them. Working out creative ways to get the job done, mostly with the vice, w/o aggravating this injury or re-injuring my left elbow as the right one heals. Being a one person show I have no one to rotate with.
 

Jessterish

Starting to get Involved
#4
Is there an user that you could get to assist on the cleaning side of things? That could help reduce the burden on your healing arm.
 
#6
It can be an issue, which is why we try to rotate techs on thread ring calibration. I had to wear a tennis elbow cuff for a while. I never use a vice unless it's a large thread ring where I need both hands to turn the ring. I'd suggest a visit to the doctor or chiropractor to see what they say.
Is there any indication as to specifically what motions/actions are causing this issue? Is it the lifting, holding of set plug while spinning ring gage, spinning the ring gage, some combination, or has it never been researched that thoroughly?
 

DietCokeofEvil

Involved In Discussions
#7
I don't remember, but since the gages arrive cleaned into our lab, it's say its the turning motion of putting the ring on the set plug.

Honestly, save yourself some wear and tear and have the gages cleaned in an ultrasonic. You are only wearing yourself out cleaning them by hand and chances are, you could be missing dirt that could wear your set plugs faster because of the debris. As found conditions have nothing to do with the cleaning method- we've been using an ultrasonic for years and we record as found and as left.
 
#8
I still have to hand clean them after the ultrasonic to get the water/detergent mix off. What do you use in your cleaner? Mine is small and in the lab with no real ventilation so will need to be non-toxic. I was using Simple Green Extreme diluted with water (about 10-15% Simple green).
 

Pjservan

Starting to get Involved
#9
While it sounds that you might have a repetitive motion issue, you might consider in having an ergonomic analysis done just to make sure that your work station is set-up correctly for the tasks that you are performing.
 
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