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TS 16949 Quality Manual Templates - Lots of free examples and great discussion!

Typically, the equipment and processes used in R&D are completely different from those used in actual production, depending on the quantity of product to be manufactured.

There is an entire discipline known as production design and engineering which designs the processes and systems to manufacture an R&D product for commercial production, regardless whether the product is a widget, a complex machine, or a pharmaceutical.

As those processes and systems are designed,
  • then equipment allocated, leased, or purchased and
  • then employees are allocated or hired, and
  • then the production plans are broken down into steps or stages and
  • then work instructions are devised and written for each of those steps,
so employees can be trained for competency to perform the tasks.

If you have a relatively simple modification to an existing product, then all of the above steps are scaled back, but they are still covered in some way.

I have a hunch, though, you merely want to see some sample work instructions for "look and feel" so you can adapt your own to the model.

Thus said, here is a very average, but serviceable format at
http://www-project.slac.stanford.edu/glastqa/qadocs/WorkInstruct1.doc

Another one is at
http://ims.ivv.nasa.gov/isodocs/IVV_05-3.doc

In modern usage, though, most professionals recommend flow charts, cartoons, photographs, even videos to make the intended process clear to workers. This is the route I would take. If it seems too overwhelming, talk to the people who will have to actually follow these work instructions you're tasked to create and ask them what style will work best for them.

After you've had a chance to consider some of the comments posted here in the Cove, come back and ask us some more after you get that input from your proposed work instruction users. If all else fails, you can give us details about the product and the machinery and proposed process and we can give you some samples to get your creative juices working.
 

Sambasi

Involved - Posts
TS 16949 Quality Manual Templates - Lots of free examples and grea

'SAFETY REQUIREMENTS' such as 'Personal Protective Equipments' required to do the work may be added, prior to start of actual 'Work Instructions' in the template
 
C

Canoehead

TS Procedure Listing

This is what I've got at the moment for my QMS Layout. Please let me know if this is good, bad or sufficient. I need an opinion beyond my Mgmt. Specifically I've got this in the flow as shown below. Does it make sense, is it intuitive to anyone else?

- Human Resources Mgmt. (i.e. Selection of employees, Job Descriptions.
- Product Development & Validation (RFQ, Contract Review, APQP, PPAP)
- Materials Management (i.e. Handling of Releases/Shipping, storage)
- Maintenance of Tooling & Equipment (i.e. Tooling & Inspection Equipment)
- Inspection & Testing (i.e. same as QS)
- Production Scheduling (i.e. Capacity Planning, scheduling)
- Control of Documents & Records (just what it sounds like)
- Product Realization (i.e. Set-Up & Work Inst., basically the making of the product)
- Internal Audits (i.e. product audits, TS audits, dock audits)
- Management Responsibility (i.e. Review, Business Planning)
- Continual Improvement (i.e.suggestion programs, kaizen)
- Control of NCP (i.e. containment, etc.)
- Corrective/Preventive Action (8D's, rework methods)

Thanks so much
 
M

Mustang

Looks like oyu have covered the bases, but I would categorize them into the three recommended areas:

Customer-Oriented Processes COP (those that support the customer directly. Often referred to as the Core Processes, i.e.: Order-Build-Ship).

Support-Oriented Processes SOP (Those that support the COPs. i.e. HR, Maintenance, Improvement)

Management-Oriented Processes MOP (Those that support the business in general, i.e. Management Responsibility).

Hope this helps...
 
C

Canoehead

Thanks for the above. Specifically I was wondering if it's permissible to have Mgmt. Responsibility towards the end, below Internal Audits indicating the flow. I'm catching flak as the set-up doesn't match the flow of the standard, i.e. Documents first, etc.

Thanks
 
M

Mustang

The way my flow is set up is the COPs are in order in the middle (left to right) then the MOPs and SOPs are in a circle (ok, rectangle) around that. MOPs and SOPs don't necessarily flow in line (the COPs do), they can happen almost any time and interact with multiple processes.

Who are you catching Flak from? Your auditor, or internal people?

You do not have to match the flow of the Standard (which isn't really a flow), in fact, I would recommend against it because it leads you down the elemental path, which is a no-no.

Here is an example of my Quality Manual (it folds like a brochure), which includes the flow:
 

Attachments

C

Canoehead

Who are you catching Flak from? Your auditor, or internal people?

You do not have to match the flow of the Standard (which isn't really a flow), in fact, I would recommend against it because it leads you down the elemental path, which is a no-no.

Catching it from above. The feeling is that the AIAG knows best how to layout a manual, so ours should match the TOC.
 

Raffy

Quite Involved in Discussions
Thank You

Hi everyone,
I find this thread very helpful since I was just a beginner for the TS16949:2002 requirements.
Again, thank you for all who contribute on this thread.
Best regards,
Raffy :cool:
 
A

Aussie

Billie Giffin said:
We are in the process of going from QS to 16949. I am also using a 2000 manual and adding the TS additional requirements. I would also like a copy of your manual when you have finished. I would just like to see the approach/format someone else has used. I would also be willing to share my manual when completed.
Hi Billie Griffin,
Saw your comments (dated Aug 2002).
We are also changing from ISO9002 to TS16949.
Our QM is about 200 pages in length, I sure would like to compare QM also to see the format and TS16949 approach.
We manufacture Bullbars.
Aussie.
 
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