Understanding, Challenging & Approving Supplier Control Plans

N

Nick-C

Hi all

Due to a change in my role I am in the process of improving the way we go about reviewing supplier documentation.

I have a question regarding supplier control plans but I guess this relates also to FMEA's and other documents.

How do you know that the suppliers control plan is good enough?

We make some parts ourselves from raw materials, but other parts that we don't have manufacturing capabilities / knowledge on are sent out for quote.

My concerns are that we don't necessarily have the knowledge to challenge the specifics of the suppliers control plan since the product may have attributes and may use manufacturing techniques that we are not familiar with. So how do we go about approving them as acceptable?

Some people tell me that the suppliers are the experts and that we must trust them, but that doesn't help when we get non-conformances that should have been prevented by better controls from the outset that have been overlooked.

Thanks


Nick
 
V

Vthouta

Hi Nick,

In that case you can request Process FMEA for the product you are getting manufactured. This will compel the supplier to let you know severity, occurrence, detection of their mfg processes.Even though you are not expert, will give you a brief how they control their internal processes.

On the control plan, you could ask what is the acceptance criteria at each operation? how they make sure the first piece meets all the requirements? If they are rejected, how does the process gets corrected??

This might help you to make a better decision in long run.

Vik
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
If you're willing to put in the time, nothing will beat actually working with them on it. Maybe you'll learn something about their process which can only be helpful.

Other than that, make sure you select qualified and experienced suppliers who are probably not the cheapest. Good luck.
 
N

Nick-C

Thanks to both of you I think I need to work on our supplier selection process since some of these 'high risk' components come from suppliers who don't use PFMEA's and therefore I question the effectiveness of their control plans.

I feel they create them because we ask them to, not because they use them for their own benefit :jawdrop:


Thanks guys


Nick
 

Golfman25

Trusted Information Resource
Thanks to both of you I think I need to work on our supplier selection process since some of these 'high risk' components come from suppliers who don't use PFMEA's and therefore I question the effectiveness of their control plans.

I feel they create them because we ask them to, not because they use them for their own benefit :jawdrop:


Thanks guys


Nick


Be careful. Just because they don't have a written "control plan" doesn't mean they aren't any good. A lot of us have been doing this long before "ISO," "control plans" and all these other new fangled terms where created. Instead, what we did was wrote notes down on an index card, print, etc. We didn't have fancy names - maybe something like "job card."
 

Johnson

Involved In Discussions
Hi all

Due to a change in my role I am in the process of improving the way we go about reviewing supplier documentation.

I have a question regarding supplier control plans but I guess this relates also to FMEA's and other documents.

How do you know that the suppliers control plan is good enough?

We make some parts ourselves from raw materials, but other parts that we don't have manufacturing capabilities / knowledge on are sent out for quote.

My concerns are that we don't necessarily have the knowledge to challenge the specifics of the suppliers control plan since the product may have attributes and may use manufacturing techniques that we are not familiar with. So how do we go about approving them as acceptable?

Some people tell me that the suppliers are the experts and that we must trust them, but that doesn't help when we get non-conformances that should have been prevented by better controls from the outset that have been overlooked.

Thanks


Nick

If you realy could help and support the supplier, you need to understand their process and product. Otherwise you may do:
- Review the documents, compare the control plan with PFMEA, working instructions, inspection plan, test plan etc. to see if they are consisten and updated.
- Trust the suppliers, but monitor the product quality at your conpany.
 
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