Understanding PPAP Appearance Approval

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#11
Jim is correct, AAR is normally required for parts which have colour, gloss, grain, texture, or other visual requirements. (Normally Interior / Exterior trim).

The Supplier can not perform the appearance approval himself in this case, only the Customer nominated person can approve the parts.

In my experience, this is someone from the Design Office (the trendy guys in jeans who draw the car, decide on interior and exterior colours, and trim concepts), who reviews the Master sample parts and approves them.

How many parts are needed, and who exactly approves them will vary depending on your part, and Customer.

However the only thing you need to include in the PPAP is the approved (signed Appearance Approval Report).

For non appearance parts ; generic good workmanship remarks, like free from cracks, free from burrs, paint defects, etc. can be listed on the dimensional report and approved as "OK".

Bottom line; If you still do not understand your exact situation, contact your Customer quality contact to discuss exactly what they expect - in the end they will approve or not the PPAP..!
That's a good summary, and you're correct--appearance approval is usually required prior to PPAP submission, especially if selling directly to OEMs (tier one suppliers).
 
T

True Position

#12
Hello True Position,

Thanks for your reply.

I'm doing the same as your recommendation (indicate data as "accept" or "OK" in dimensional result sheet)

For 2nd part, what is the meaning of 'customer facing item'? = Customer observable items? that's why need to control judgment standard for appearance such as coloring?

Thank you!!
Yes, things the customer will see (even if normally hidden, such as inside the glove box, the engine cover, etc) will have specific requirements for color, grain, and other appearance features.
 

Miner

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Admin
#13
My automotive experience is getting a little dated, but when the AAR was invoked, it was spelled out on the drawing to the effect of: "Appearance must be approved by <insert name> engineering." We would then fill out the AAR, submit it and parts for approval by said engineering then include the approved AAR in the PPAP package.

No note on drawing = no AAR in PPAP.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#14
My automotive experience is getting a little dated, but when the AAR was invoked, it was spelled out on the drawing to the effect of: "Appearance must be approved by <insert name> engineering." We would then fill out the AAR, submit it and parts for approval by said engineering then include the approved AAR in the PPAP package.

No note on drawing = no AAR in PPAP.
I never saw a direct reference to appearance approval on a drawing, but it just goes to show that there's more than one way that the AAR requirement might be invoked. In general, and especially when dealing directly with US OEMs, whenever color, gloss and/or texture (usually in the case of molded plastic parts) is specified, the AAR is required. In each of those cases, masters are usually provided by the customer (or are commercially available, as with grain and texture) and in most cases variables data is required.
 
W

WKHANNA

#15
I have a customer in the power distribution industry who requires an AAR for any plated (metallic) items. There is no end-user cosmetic requirement.

The terms & exact procedure for filling out the AAR form were agreed to prior to PPAP submission. (I learned the hard way)

Seems silly to me when we provide a plating certification from our sub-contracted plater along with our own plating inspection form.

Just another case of the infamous customer 'Rubber Stamp' procedure for PPAP's, in my humble opinion.
 

whtan02

Involved In Discussions
#16
I have a customer in the power distribution industry who requires an AAR for any plated (metallic) items. There is no end-user cosmetic requirement.

The terms & exact procedure for filling out the AAR form were agreed to prior to PPAP submission. (I learned the hard way)

Seems silly to me when we provide a plating certification from our sub-contracted plater along with our own plating inspection form.

Just another case of the infamous customer 'Rubber Stamp' procedure for PPAP's, in my humble opinion.
What is the meaning of "customer 'Rubber Stamp' procedure"?
Can you explain little bit ?
 
#17
What is the meaning of "customer 'Rubber Stamp' procedure"?
Can you explain little bit ?
"Rubber Stamp" is when someone just goes through the motion. For instance if you provide your customer with repeated responses on something like PPAP forms, it creates a red flag. Rubber Stamping PFMEA for example would be like submitting 5 PPAP's on different parts but your PFMEA are too similar. This becomes a possible rejection or a non-conformity during an Audit. (truly depending on your customer and their requirements)
 

QChas

Involved - Posts
#18
I have also done the same for notes on drawings such as 'must be free of scratches", "uniform appearance", "no cracks'", etc. Assign a number on the drawing next to the note and record 'Visual OK' note on the dimensional result sheet.
 

Mikey324

Involved In Discussions
#19
Appearance requirements such as "free from scratches, dented on the motor casing", "No crack on the Gear" etc. These are purely appearance items without specific measurement data, judgement by Go, No-Go basis, but surely it is non-relevent to colour issue here. At this moment, I'm putting all these items under dimensional check-sheet, data indicated as "Accept".
We have a similar requirement from a customer. As part of the dimensional measurements, we rate as "OK" or "NG". I agree with Jim, that would be the way to go.
 

optomist1

A Sea of Statistics
Trusted
#20
a few cents more...some OEMs have revised the term....AAR has given way to TAAR Technical AAR....that aside...."usually", the dictating factor (assuming purchasing or another group DID NOT erroneously checked the AAR required box), is Class of Surface, this usually dictates if an AAR is required. Class "A", as I recall receiving the most scrutiny...this s/b called out on drawing/specs....
 

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