Unsecured pedestal mounted tools, oh my!

rstocum

Quite Involved in Discussions
#1
I have been away for a while. Unfortunately QC/QA/QE is a habit like heroin. You can kick it, but eventually it pulls you back in. I am working for a small, relatively new company. They have many issues, but I am looking at the high risk ones first. It is a fabrication facility with a lot of pedestal mounted equipment. The bases of the equipment are heavy, but not so heavy that they can't fall over if bumped by a fork truck, or if a heavy work piece is held up to it for processing and is dropped. Not a single pedestal mounted tool is secured to the floor. One of them I discovered resting on a fatigue reducing mat, making it even more tippy. I feel this is an OSHA, or state regulatory risk, not to mention the insurance risk. Does anyone know the relevant regulatory requirements, or can send me in the direction to find them myself?
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#2
There is a whole lot of guidance (regulations, common interpretations and more) on the OSHA website...

You can browse forever on there without directly involving OSHA (which I assume you'd like to avoid until things are known compliant).

When is the last time there was an OSHA inspection at the site? What findings, if any?
 

rstocum

Quite Involved in Discussions
#5
No on site visits ever, to my knowledge. I want to present all the reasons why these tools should be secured because I already know the argument against securing them. Tools get moved around for convenience, and bolting them down is not convenient. When you are trying to overcome that mindset, all the reasons will be needed. I will try the OSHA database, thank you.
 

normzone

Quite Involved in Discussions
#7
I have been away for a while. Unfortunately QC/QA/QE is a habit like heroin. You can kick it, but eventually it pulls you back in.
(Amy Winehouse voice) They tried to make me go to rehab, but I said " Hey, there are a lot of inefficiencies in this process, I see a couple of places where we could save time and increase reliability of the process ".

:bonk:
 

ADSJT

Quality Engineer
#8
You might want to contact the State OSHA. At a previous employer, we used the state's consultation program with great benefit. Their assistance was available for small businesses at no cost. They also did measurements of sound levels and air quality for us. We diligently followed their suggestions and implemented the changes. (Securing pedestals was one of the suggestions.) A couple of years later we had a full blown Federal site visit with zero findings. In fact, the auditor returned a few times because his supervisor expected findings. Good luck with your efforts.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#9
You might want to contact the State OSHA. At a previous employer, we used the state's consultation program with great benefit. Their assistance was available for small businesses at no cost. They also did measurements of sound levels and air quality for us. We diligently followed their suggestions and implemented the changes. (Securing pedestals was one of the suggestions.) A couple of years later we had a full blown Federal site visit with zero findings. In fact, the auditor returned a few times because his supervisor expected findings. Good luck with your efforts.
This is good advice, IF AND ONLY IF you have the support to "diligently follow their suggestions".

If you get the advice and don't follow it, it will be harder to defend than "I didn't know, I'll do it right now".

Honestly, not much of a difference between the two...OSHA isn't one for being flexible...but what's the point of getting good advice if you don't follow it...
 

ADSJT

Quality Engineer
#10
The first place to start would be getting upper management buy in before contacting state OSHA because, at least in my state, we were given a list of action items and a due date for implementation. If we chose not to implement, the state could notify Federal of our noncompliance.

We were fully committed to making our workplace safe. We would have rather spent money on safety measures than spend it on OSHA fines. After the fines, you still have to spend the money on implementation.

Maybe you can present them with examples of companies in you industry who have been fined, and the types of nonconformances that were observed.


Do you take care of the OSHA logs? If your DART number is higher than industry standards, it is only a matter of time until OSHA shows up.
 
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