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Week 2 Discussion - What is Quality?

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R

Roberta

#11
I agree quality is striving for customer satisfaction of the product, with the added influence that quality is relative to what the customer draws from the market. For example, when digital cameras first came out they were bulky and I am sure the picture quality was nothing compared to what you can get today. Why do we need more megapixels? Because we are all wanting to print poster-size photos? No, because the market is driving the product to have more megapixels and making the customer believe they need a most number of megapixels to have the best quality camera.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#12
Roberta said:
For example, when digital cameras first came out they were bulky and I am sure the picture quality was nothing compared to what you can get today.
Funny you should mention digital cameras. I recently heard the story from an ex-Polaroid employee that an engineer at Polaroid suggested the idea of digital photography in 1982. Management snuffed out the idea. Now, you may ask, where is Polaroid today? Simply meeting existing customer expectations for instant picture cameras was not sufficent.
 

amjadrana

Involved - Posts
#13
The definition of quality and grade has mostly been interlinked. Quality has been defined in the standard ISO 9000-2000 as

Degree to which a set of inherent characteristics fulfils requirements.

ISO 9000-2000 (3.1.1)


This is a good and precise definition.

Grade has been defined as:

Category or rank given to different quality requirements for products, processes or systems having the same functional use.
A high grade entity (e.g.a luxurious hotel) can be of unsatisfactory quality and vice versa.
ISO 9000-2000 (3.1.3)

Fitness for use and other definitions offer only one aspect of the whole spectrum. Why re-invent the wheel. Enough time has been given to this topic.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#14
amjadrana said:
Fitness for use and other definitions offer only one aspect of the whole spectrum. Why re-invent the wheel. Enough time has been given to this topic.
Please note this is a student discussion area. I am asking the students to discover some of this past information for themselves, though always appreciative of any outside of the class participation.
 
M

Mary Davenport

#15
Steve Prevette said:
True, there is no "Clear" or "True" definitions for quality. As you consider this question though, what does quality mean to you personally in your purchasing decisions? And can that be extended to a business definition?
Well from a purchasing perspective quality takes on a whole new meaning and increases the number of sign-offs I need on a requisition by 3 people. This only means that our quality/environmental/health people must ensure that various quality considerations are included in the statement of work and that we have completely informed the vendor of our expectations for the services they will provide.
 
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rtstewart1

#16
Quality....

For my :2cents: , Quality is whatever the customers think it is. In essence, Quality has become a perception. The most precisely designed and accurately manufactured product that has not met the customer's expectations will fall below their level of perceived quality.
 
J

Jamie Morris

#17
Steve Prevette said:
True, there is no "Clear" or "True" definitions for quality. As you consider this question though, what does quality mean to you personally in your purchasing decisions? And can that be extended to a business definition?
From a business prospective, quality has to be institutionlized in every segment of the business process. From inputs (suppliers, raw materials, component parts, etc.) through the transformation process (producing the product, assembling the components parts to make the whole) to the output (final product). Additionally, all the supporting functions that go into taking the product from raw material to distribution (marketing, engineering, sales, etc.) have to ensure the quality of their forecasts, designs, distribution channels, and projections, etc. The final measure of quality is did the product meet and/or exceed the customers' expectations. I believe that if Dr. Demings system (14 points) is applied for each part/function of the system (an organization is a system with component parts or functions), then the organization can achieve a high level of quality in addition to continual improvement and growth. The true measure will be if the P is maximized in this equation: R - C = $P. This is afterall the bottom line.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#18
Jamie Morris said:
The true measure will be if the P is maximized in this equation: R - C = $P. This is afterall the bottom line.
Very good ideas in your post. Integration of quality into production. Perhaps we don't need a "separate" definition for quality . . . treat the whole as a system.
 
D

dwall

#19
ralphsulser said:
Well yes, but: Fit for use of intended function, at a reasonable cost.
Superior quality can be attained, and you expect superior at a high cost.
Why pay for a Rolls Royce if you only need, and want the attributes of a Chevrolet Impala. You can expect good quality and relaibility at a more reasonable cost. Value for your dollar. Isn't this why we shop for the best deal?
I agree...quality should be fit for use of its intended function...as defined by the customer. We could build a high quality product but if it does not meet the customers needs, cost, or time frame I don't think it is considered quality in the customer's eyes. Several years ago. I attended a TQM seminar where we were told that there were 3 words used when discussing a quality product: good, cheap, and fast. But...we could only have two of the three. If we wanted good and fast, it would not be cheap. If we wanted fast and cheap, it would not be good. If we wanted good and cheap, it would not be fast. In our process of continual improvement, I think that we may be able to gain all three by reaching a balance between them. But the ultimate arbitraitor is always the customer.
 
G

Garry

#20
Quality

I would like to challenge the term "Quality Management". Think less of "Quality" and more of Business Process Management. Every process (input - Process - output) is a business process that requires to e managed. Quality is part of the output. The standards world should eliminate the word Quality and replace it completely with Business Management.
 
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