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What is Dock to Dock Time and how is it calculated?

E

emutlu

#1
hi everyone,

What do you know about dock to dock time and how can i calculate it.

it a metric for QOS.

Thank you in advance.
 
#2
Re: DOCK TO DOCK TIME

I don't know if this helps, but we have a delivery time (5 days early, 3 days late) window. However what we are finding is about 1/2 of the 'late's' were delivered on time, just not received in our customer until 4-10 days after delivery.

You may need to consider this.
 

somashekar

Staff member
Super Moderator
#3
hi everyone,

What do you know about dock to dock time and how can i calculate it.

it a metric for QOS.

Thank you in advance.
Total Cycle Time
Total time to complete a physical process, including wait time and inventory time. Also known as Dock to Dock Time. For example: Raw material is received and is consumed over 15 days and the manufacturing process takes 7 days, including time spent in buffer inventories. Total cycle time is therefore 22 days. The definition can be broadened to include finished goods.
 

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Staff member
Super Moderator
#4
you need to define it exactly for your needs and your situation.

for example one could say that the clock starts when the product is loaded onto the truck at the originating dock and it stops when the product is offloaded at the destination dock.

another example is that the clock starts when the pick order is generated for the origin and stops when the material is recieved in at the destination.

so it really depends on what you are trying to track...
 
#5
hi everyone,

What do you know about dock to dock time and how can i calculate it.

it a metric for QOS.

Thank you in advance.
Total Cycle Time
Total time to complete a physical process, including wait time and inventory time. Also known as Dock to Dock Time. For example: Raw material is received and is consumed over 15 days and the manufacturing process takes 7 days, including time spent in buffer inventories. Total cycle time is therefore 22 days. The definition can be broadened to include finished goods.
you need to define it exactly for your needs and your situation.

for example one could say that the clock starts when the product is loaded onto the truck at the originating dock and it stops when the product is offloaded at the destination dock.

another example is that the clock starts when the pick order is generated for the origin and stops when the material is recieved in at the destination.

so it really depends on what you are trying to track...
As Bev indicates, a definition depends on who is asking and what he/she intends to do with the data.

For example, if QOS is "Quality Operating System," then somashekar's response would probably be part of the data considered when planning a Lean operation (as used by ASQ Lean Enterprise Division asq.org/le/)

If QOS is "Quality of Service," then it is a metric used and evaluated by a customer in making decisions about lead time, order size, warehousing, shipping costs, and myriad other concerns in choosing one supplier over another or planning its own production operation.

Michael_M raises yet another issue about the internal efficiency of a customer when there is a long delay between delivery of product to a customer's dock and final adjudication of "acceptance" after delays which may include inefficient incoming inspection or key person illness, or just overburdened receiving departments.
I don't know if this helps, but we have a delivery time (5 days early, 3 days late) window. However what we are finding is about 1/2 of the 'late's' were delivered on time, just not received in our customer until 4-10 days after delivery. You may need to consider this.
So, emutlu, who is asking the question and how will the data be used? Complicating the calculation may be that (in somashekar's usage) every product may have a different result (job shop operations or multiple product lines.) In Bev's usage, shipping distance, choice of mode of shipping, and brand of shipping company will play a big part, as well as whether the product is plucked from inventory or made to order. In Michael's usage, whether the customer considers the product "received" until it has passed customer acceptance inspection.
 

QATN11

Involved In Discussions
#6
I agree with every point Wes made and would to suggest these additional comments.

Walk your process flow from order placement through to the point the order leaves your facility going to the customer.

You or your analysis team stands in as the order. Map your travel and measure travel time from station to station and mark milestones along the way. Estimate the time it takes to receive materials i.e. Order processing time, planning, release to production and so on. Pay special attention to time the order remains in the various queues.

Depending on your business model and ability to track order cycles, there are several dates that are important: 1)Order Received Date, 2)Customer Ship Request Date, 3)Acknowledged/Agreed to Ship Date, 4)Revised Ship Date, 5)Order Available to Ship Date, 6)Customer Release to Ship Date and 7)Actual Ship Date. While it may seem like there are too many dates to keep up with, a full analysis for improvement cannot be done for dock to dock metric improvement can be implemented. I have spent many hours debating "On-time Delivery" metrics with folks trying to justify their department's performance numbers when in fact, the system needs to be analyzed as a whole.

If your QOS/IT system cannot track these dates automatically, track enough orders through the system to identify its constraints. This may take several weeks to determine, as different scenarios will need to be included to get an accurate picture. Otherwise, you will find many anomalies and will be repeating studies trying to figure out odd variances. Once constraints are identified, you should be able to identify the key dates to calculate Order Cycle time appropriate for your company.

If your facility produces both Make-to-Order and Make-to-Stock orders, analyze their MTO and MTS Order Cycle times separately. If your product line has different levels of production processing complexity, I would recommend analyzing the order flow of product families.

The travel time to the customer is a separate discussion. If you company is not responsible for the carrier selection and delivery, this part of the order cycle need not be included.
 
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