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What is your typical attendance of ASQ program meetings?

How many ASQ Program meetings do you attend?

  • I don’t attend ASQ Program meeting at all.

    Votes: 14 53.8%
  • Attend about >25% and up to 50% of the meetings/year

    Votes: 5 19.2%
  • Attend >50%,<75% of the meetings/Year

    Votes: 4 15.4%
  • I attend all Program meetings.

    Votes: 3 11.5%

  • Total voters
    26
C

cbehrens

#11
I have been on the board of my section for the last 7 years and have attended most of the section meetings. We average between 10 and 25 attending the meetings. This is for a section of 400+ members. We have an arrangement with a local college to use one of their rooms so we charge nothing to 5 dollars a meeting and offer pizza sandwiches etc. We formerly charged $20-$25 for the meeting at several different local local eateries and still lost money due to the room charges. Now we pretty much break even. The meetings also move along quicker as the food is there and ready to go so there is no waiting to order etc.

One of the biggest frustrations of being a board member is putting all of the time and effort in to arranging the section meetings and then only having the board plus two or three members show up. It makes it difficult to stay enthusiastic about being on the board. We have commisioned several polls of our membership and get very few answers.
 

Govind

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
#12
cbehrens said:
....One of the biggest frustrations of being a board member is putting all of the time and effort in to arranging the section meetings and then only having the board plus two or three members show up. It makes it difficult to stay enthusiastic about being on the board. We have commisioned several polls of our membership and get very few answers.
You are not alone..One important item so far posts did not cover is attendance of section executives. We have a standard 33% attendance of section executives in any given meeting. So only the balance 67% is non volunteers.Program Chair with all that effort is also surprised to see the low attendance of outside volunteer base.

Sometimes, the speakers get very discouraged with the attendance. Specifically (all their preparation )to notice only 15 people turned up for the meeting.

I have done analysis on this program data as well. I will share in the next few posts.
Regards,
Govind.
 

Govind

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
#13
Sidney Vianna said:
The format for the ASQ OC meetings is:
2 clinics, prior to dinner. One of the clinics is the So Cal ISO Users Group, which I arrange speakers for. Then dinner and then the guest speaker. Sessions start around 5:45 and end around 9 PM
In the US sections, members use terms like
Clinics
Dinner Meetings
Workshops

Canadian Section uses the general term "Program Meetings"

Can anyone explain what this activity means from US section's interpretation?
How they are different from each other?

Regards,
Govind.
 
#14
Some comments about programs and presenters

As an experienced presenter, I always ask how many can be expected in the audience. If the number seems disappointingly low, I offer to help to "hype" the meeting to generate a higher turnout. I expect the person booking me to be honest with the answer. In any regard, once prepared for a small audience, presenter may modify the presentation for a more intimate setting.

(At this point, let's not enter into whether the "program chair" of the section is one of those driven individuals who has a schedule for 20 months in advance with a pool of backup presenters in the event of last minute illness or accident. Some program chairs are absolutely terrific - others are adrift in a sea of cluelessness.)

Whether the meetings are called clinics, workshops, programs, presentations, speeches is immaterial and strictly personal preference and perhaps local practice.

In my opinion, "clinics" and "workshops" denote interactive sessions where audience members get a chance to have hands on opportunities for input and give-and-take with the presenter and with each other. This could be as simple as pencil-and-paper exercises or (in one case) interaction with a bunch of laptop computers brought in and set up to run on a wired or wireless network for instant "anonymous" vote tallies.

The generic term "program" or "presentation" could also cover clinics and workshops, but usually they are straightforward lectures on a specific topic with Q & A offered during the presentation or saved until after the presentation.

Here's two examples to illustrate what I mean (based on one of our Cove stalwarts, Steve Prevette):

Steve runs a Red Bead "workshop." (http://www.hanford.gov/safety/vpp/redbeadreach.pdf) The folks in the audience actually play with the props from Deming's famous Red Bead experiment.

Steve also has several presentations (a recent one is posted as a PowerPoint program in the Reading Room SPC Overview.) This presentation is a classic lecture. Audience members sit while presenter "presents."

"Programs" have variable meanings according to the Program Chair's point of view.

Some years, I have seen adept Program Chairs map out an entire year's schedule of presentations based on a "program agenda" which may focus on different aspects of various Quality Management System Standards (ISO9001:2000; TS16949; ISO13485; ISO14000; etc.), presenting issues from both auditor and auditee viewpoints. Presentation methods may be two "talking heads" or a panel or one expert who manages to cover all angles.

Interspersed with the general program may be pre-meeting clinics on certification exams, obtaining and organizing recertification units, problem solving, etc.

The best Program Chairs continually evaluate programs that work and those that don't, seeking feedback from members after each presentation.

I consider the best advertising for bringing members to the meetings is a strong monthly newsletter which enthusiastically hypes upcoming programs and fairly critiques the most recent program, giving attribution to good reviews from members while presenting bad reviews anonymously. Reading the newsletter should evoke a desire to be at the next presentation in hopes of catching something as good as the most recent one reviewed in the newsletter. Every issue of the newsletter should have contact information for new presenters or a way to suggest future programs to fulfill a perceived need.

This is a good thread topic, govind.:applause:
 
Last edited:

Govind

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
#15
Thanks Wes. :)
I appreciate everyone taking time to offer many suggestions for Program Meetings. This is exactly I wanted to obtain from this subtopic ASQ Section Management!
-Opportunity as member to member having constructive discussion and idea exchange to better our section performance.

Thanks for the clarification on Clinics Vs Programs. It made a lot of sense.
I realize we have not done that “clinic” type event so far in the last 3 years. This input is very useful. I would like to hear some examples of Clinics. I gathered from you that conducting a “Red bead experiment” is a potential clinic type event. Iam going to pursue this idea and lessons learned from Steven . P’s program event.

We once did the ISO9001: 2000 –Registrar auditor view and Consultant view back in fall 2002. This is the only event I remember with an attendance of over 60 (16% of member attendance). We could not get this attendance ever after in any format/topic of program.

Program Chair is a very demanding job. I can empathize his/her situation. It is always tense until the speakers show up to the program. We conduct 8 or 9 events + 1 conference a year. This is plenty of speakers/back up speakers to contact.

Recently, I did an analysis by collecting the postal codes of all section members’ address from the database (I was authorized). I sorted out the data and segregated by the zone either they live or work, later by transferring the numbers to a Postal Code Map, I was able to visualize the member concentration by Postal code and location of the current Program event location.

I was taken to surprise by noticing the current Program Location is 180 deg apart from the heavy member concentration area (80 members). I presented this data in our brainstorm session and now we are considering conducting programs in both west and east ends of the city to study this situation in more detail.

I request those who polled “I don’t attend program meeting at all” be kind enough to post the reason. This is a great opportunity for us to learn from you and improve the quality of Program events.

:thanx: Thanks for your patience reading this lengthy post! Continue your poll. I would welcome any ideas of improving the program attendance, suggestions of clinics, program topics, etc.

Regards,
Govind.
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#16
I'm glad to hear the Red Bead Experiment come up. I will say that I am willing to do the Red Beads for any ASQ section within reasonable driving distance or would cover an airline ticket.

One problem I have personally encountered as a Section Chair is that I am a known Deming supporter, but am also the chair. I took it "in the shorts" on our Section Survey ran by ASQ Headquarters a few years back, when two AQP members (out of the 4 total who took the survey) basically blasted me as section chair for only caring about statistics. ASQ went so far as to publish the survey results on the open internet, complete with direct references to that horrible section chair person.

So, I am very careful within my own section as the chair not to be seen as pushing Deming or statistics upon the section (I wish the senior ASQ leadership would see this as an example, but they continue to push their own agendas - primarily six sigma).
 

Govind

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
#17
Steve Prevette said:
I'm glad to hear the Red Bead Experiment come up. I will say that I am willing to do the Red Beads for any ASQ section within reasonable driving distance or would cover an airline ticket.

.....
I wish some day we can afford to invite professional like Steve to offer a speech/presentation.We are not one of the wealthy section :(
As I mentioned earlier, we make loss by running 8 to 9 program events every year.

Is there any way, you can do a WEBEX,Conference call and one of us can be your representative doing the demonstration? (Training experts may not agree with approach as not an effective way...)

Read Bead kit- Can this be rented for an event anywhere?

Any suggestions without spending big section $$$?

Regards,
Govind.
 
#18
Govind said:
I wish some day we can afford to invite professional like Steve to offer a speech/presentation.We are not one of the wealthy section :(
As I mentioned earlier, we make loss by running 8 to 9 program events every year.

Is there any way, you can do a WEBEX,Conference call and one of us can be your representative doing the demonstration? (Training experts may not agree with approach as not an effective way...)

Read Bead kit- Can this be rented for an event anywhere?

Any suggestions without spending big section $$$?

Regards,
Govind.
The "Red Bead" script is available in several places - I'm sure Steve could help. I'm not sure about patent issues, but I'm pretty sure there is no infringement if you make and copy a patented item for your personal use as long as you do not resell it or charge to "play" with it. Therefore, the equipment is readily reproduced (jar, beads, paddle) by a handy craftsman who wants to donate time and materials to his organization.

My guess is the cost of the beads is the biggest number. Any shop could make bead boards of various numbers of holes out of any material ranging from wood to plastic to metal. Any big container for the beads will do ranging from custom lucite to Tupperware or Rubbermaid container from Walmart or KMart. The point is simply the beads, container, and paddle are only props for the game. Expensive props or dirt cheap props make no difference to the "moral of the tale."

Maybe a deep pocket member or corporation can donate a set.

There's one picture of an expensive set offered by Don Wheeler's company at
http://www.knoxshops.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?&DID=36&User_ID=57035&st=7113&st2=-80055539&st3=31696804&ObjectGroup_ID=32&Product_ID=166&CatID=16

Another company offers a slightly different version
The Dr. Deming style RED BEAD Experiment ISBN 0-9721828-0-2 consisting of 3200 WHITE colored plastic 6mm beads; 800 RED colored beads; black metal paddle with 50 holes; Rubbermaid 2 qt clear plastic tub with lid; 32 minute video tape ISBN 0-9721828-1-0 and 48 page Study Guide ISBN 0-9721828-2-9 (PDF download)
for 169.95 plus shipping, etc.
Samples of the video and ordering info can be found here:
http://www.redbead.com/
I think it's OK - maybe a little heavy on Japan, Inc. hype.

Use Google and pressure Steve to help you find a way to get your own. The opportunities for using it expand once you have one to use.
 

Govind

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
#19
Many Thanks for great ideas

Wes,
Thanks for the great suggestions.

Another resource that just came to mind is local university. I would assume any university teaching Industrial Engineering or MBA is suppose to teach Read bead experiment as well. (correct?)

Your suggestion of $165.95 USD option does not seem very expensive. It is still a good idea as a local ASQ section to purchase, use for the program event and later loan free to local Quality practitioners / university to conduct non-profit trainings. (As a quality service from a quality organization!)

Regards,
Govind.
 
#20
If you get the Red Beads, the next step is to create a Speaker's Bureau from your Section to take the story of Quality on the road. Don't just lend the gear - send a speaker/facilitator along. I can envision a host of tie-ins to go along with the Red Beads, not least of which is membership in ASQ! Add to that having hosts sending employees to training sessions sponsored by local Section (CQE, CQM, SS, SQA, etc.)
 
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