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What Specific Tests are Required to Label a Device as being DEHP Free

Z

zmimshen

#1
Hi all,
Are there any specific tests that are required in order to label a device as being DEHP Free?
Our NB asked why we didn't add this to the labeling but I have only been able to find a requirement to indicate the presence of DEHP and not the absence of it.

Any thoughts?
 
P

PaulGr

#2
Hi,

It's the same for me. I am not aware of any requirement to identify the absence of a specific substance on the label. For phthalates, the MDD (Annex I, 7.5) only requires the phthalates symbol when the device contains phthalates...

For commercial reasons, it can help to identify what's not in the device. Like the 'latex free' symbols which is also - as far as I know - not required by any regulation.
 
S

ssz102

#3
futher info that you can find out in REACH regulation and also can be inquire ralated consultative bodies
 

Ronen E

Problem Solver
Staff member
Super Moderator
#4
Hi all,
Are there any specific tests that are required in order to label a device as being DEHP Free?
Our NB asked why we didn't add this to the labeling but I have only been able to find a requirement to indicate the presence of DEHP and not the absence of it.

Any thoughts?
It's not about testing. You (or the manufacturer) should have full knowledge of what has been put into the device! DEHP is commonly used as a PVC plasticizer -- in such a case the supplier is ought to tell the customer whether they use DEHP or another type of plasticizer in their formulation (if they refuse, I wouldn't buy from them!).
 
P

PaulGr

#5
It's not about testing. You (or the manufacturer) should have full knowledge of what has been put into the device! DEHP is commonly used as a PVC plasticizer -- in such a case the supplier is ought to tell the customer whether they use DEHP or another type of plasticizer in their formulation (if they refuse, I wouldn't buy from them!).
Well, testing can be an option. In the past, I have organized phthalate testing for those parts where we could not get the required information through the supply chain. Testing was performed by an external lab and for every sample we got a sheet specifying the contents and percentages.
 

Ronen E

Problem Solver
Staff member
Super Moderator
#6
Well, testing can be an option. In the past, I have organized phthalate testing for those parts where we could not get the required information through the supply chain. Testing was performed by an external lab and for every sample we got a sheet specifying the contents and percentages.
IMHO, a supplier that can't / won't tell you whether or not you get DEHP in the product is not one you want to work with, if you have a choice. In that sort of relationship (for whatever reason), who knows what else might be in the product? Or even if what they do tell you is trustworthy. You can't test for "everything" and it also doesn't make sense. Someone created this product so for sure someone knows what has intentionally gone into it.

We're not talking about some exotic contaminant here. We're talking about DEHP -- a mainstream, long recognized concern in the industry.
 
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