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What to do when Employees are not following Instructions

#52
As a quality professional, yes. But as an employee...in truth, your job is whatever management says it is.

In what percent of companies the QM's actual job is to gamely struggle with quality issues so that management doesn't have to be bothered....I've often wondered, while not being sure that I really want to know.
That's an amusing point, [Julie O]. I view my job as shielding the powers at the top from what they don't need to be bothered by, and waving what they should be bothered by in their field of vision until they notice.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#53
Just another two cents...

Management hires a Quality Manager to...well...Manage Quality stuff, right?
If Top Management was constantly involved with the nitty gritty of the Quality Dept, two things would happen:
1. They would recognize that they didn't need a Quality manager since they were doing it themselves
2. They wouldn't have time to do the things that (I hope) are more strategically important outside of the Quality System.

Does this mean that Top Management is totally disconnected from Quality or the Quality system? I sure hope not...but I figure it's more true than is good for folks.

I think normzone's approach is pretty effective. Handle stuff so Top Management doesn't have to be involved more than reading a summary...and bring to them the things that they have to handle themselves (and make sure they handle it).

Just thinking out loud...
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#54
There is always the chance that employees will continue to do things their way in spite of supervisors/managers carefully determining the procedural way is correct and after numerous, appropriate interventions to correct the behavior.

Management is required to provide resources necessary to perform the activities in support of customer satisfaction/whatever (this can work for any of the standards and their associated disciplines) but that is not the end. Once they provide, their responsibility is not over. It is true that some people just don't want to do as they are told, don't get along with others, etc. Some are disruptive in acting out their go-it-alone preferences. If they are risking product acceptance or compliance with some other requirement, management should consider reassigning them or dismissing them. My wholehearted wish is that this would be the last step, but I have also seen some employers take too long in the process. Toxic employees can sometimes do real damage.
:2cents:
 
#55
Management is required to provide resources necessary to perform the activities in support of customer satisfaction/whatever (this can work for any of the standards and their associated disciplines) but that is not the end. Once they provide, their responsibility is not over.
:2cents:
Good point. My experience has been that lots of top management folks say " Make it so " or " There is no try, there is only do " and then fail to allocate resources, or appropriately followup with the persons doing otherwise.

Changing the ingrained response patterns of a person who made their way to the top using them is not an easy task.

I keep stressing that while $#!* rolls downhill, responsibility rolls uphill. It may get me fired someday, but that's the way the cookie crumbles.
 
J

Julie O

#56
That's an amusing point, [Julie O]. I view my job as shielding the powers at the top from what they don't need to be bothered by, and waving what they should be bothered by in their field of vision until they notice.
I think this is a wise strategy.
 
J

Julie O

#57
Management hires a Quality Manager to...well...Manage Quality stuff, right?
Happily in medical devices, the position is Quality System Manager, which I think helps to reduce some confusion about the role. They manage the system by which their company manages quality, they are not responsible for managing quality itself.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#58
Happily in medical devices, the position is Quality System Manager, which I think helps to reduce some confusion about the role. They manage the system by which their company manages quality, they are not responsible for managing quality itself.
LOL, how dare you use proper terminology to accurately communicate a thought!

Well done.
 
#59
When documenting processes, it's best to pretend not to know what the process will be, ask the employees doing the job to help you document the process that will result in positive output, this then supplies both ownership from the employees doing the job and a documented process for you. There is no sense setting up a challenge that will result in both parties getting frustrated and the end result will be failure.
 

John Broomfield

Staff member
Super Moderator
#60
When documenting processes, it's best to pretend not to know what the process will be, ask the employees doing the job to help you document the process that will result in positive output, this then supplies both ownership from the employees doing the job and a documented process for you. There is no sense setting up a challenge that will result in both parties getting frustrated and the end result will be failure.
Indeed, treat the process owner as the expert. Sit yourself in the co-pilot position and the owner to the left of you as they are the pilot.

Ask questions and listen carefully to the answers starting with "what is the objective of this process?". You'll be amazed by how many procedures specify the purpose of the procedure but fail to specify the purpose of its process itself.
 


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